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Which system is better 50 or 75 Ohm

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g86

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vswr 50r 75r

Earlier 75 Ohm systems were used. Most probably it was a Russian standerd. Not sure though. But now 50 Ohm has become standard almost in all applications. My question is which system is better?

I feel 75 Ohm is better because easily connected with dipole or yagi antennas. Suitable for edge fed Microstrip as the edge impedances are typically closer to 75 Ohm. Probe feed diameters are become thinner and thus can be usefull for higher frequencies. Power loss due to termination will be smaller. And more ..

What is your opinion?

:!: :idea: :?:
 

vanderspunk

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75 50 ohm coax loss miss match

75 ohm was optimized for low loss in air-filled coaxial transmission lines, but not for power handling. 50 ohm was a compromise.
See the attached document for more info.
 

g86

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A very nice topic. A bag full of thanx for you.

:!: :idea: :?:

vanderspunk said:
75 ohm was optimized for low loss in air-filled coaxial transmission lines, but not for power handling. 50 ohm was a compromise.
See the attached document for more info.
 

flatulent

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old standards

These values go back to at least 1940. The RG prefix in cables such as RG8 and RG11 are US military nomenclature. Back then there was only solid dielectric and air dielectric with spacers supporting the inner conductors.

During the war equipment was shared between nations and that is why you found the 75 onm cable so common. Most of the equipment that used higher frequencies needed low loss cable. The lower frequency equipment used open wire transmission lines.
 

S

sick_man

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the 50 R system was devised too allow for silicon too give better transfer charicteristics over long runs of cable

the original system for 75 R was an open wire ladder feeder
first used for reception antennas but only at that time for 1/2 wave dipoles = 1.1 SWR @75R
where as a 50R feeder needs a 50 antenna load and a transmitter load
to allow for full power delivery
a 75 R system has a bigger bandwidth and several nice features of groundwave systems
missing or not fully exploited by 50R systems
a dipole in free space will always have an impedance of 75R too give 1.1 ratios

50R systems are also lots more tollerant of missmatch
as the system runs on a perminant "balanced" missmatch

the transmiter wont heat up too much unless there is a short
bit like a zobial network in an audio amp
 

ME

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Are 75 ohm used for other applications than radio, TV and satellite systems?
 

flatulent

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two things

Video base band systems frequently use 75 ohm cable.

Good thought Monkey Business. Dipole antennas are 72 ohms impedance. The use of an identical impedance feed line produces the best transmission of energy. The twin lead was used for four reasons. It has lower loss than coax. It has lower weight than coax and put less stress on the antenna to hold it up. It was balanced just like the antenna. It cost less than coax.
 

donda

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g86 said:
Earlier 75 Ohm systems were used. Most probably it was a Russian standerd. Not sure though. But now 50 Ohm has become standard almost in all applications. My question is which system is better?

I feel 75 Ohm is better because easily connected with dipole or yagi antennas. Suitable for edge fed Microstrip as the edge impedances are typically closer to 75 Ohm. Probe feed diameters are become thinner and thus can be usefull for higher frequencies. Power loss due to termination will be smaller. And more ..

What is your opinion?

:!: :idea: :?:
8O
You must practicing or learninng or alse,so beware us from dummy quest.,
First you must know-it is free(vacuum)-wawe-resistance.it is aprox. 278 Ohm,so 75 Ohm cable is best for impedance transforming without heavy looses,when you are building downlink.
Another hand,signal supression is optimal in 51 Ohm fider,and it is very important to transfer high power UPLINK with min. looses,it is better to brought signal directly to antena with 50-Ohm line and then transform to 278 ohm.
 

flatulent

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one more thought

Here is some more information.

Many types of antennas have lower impedances. Verticals worked against a ground plane are 36 ohms. Parasitic antennas like the Udi (Yagi) have lower feed impedances.

Impedance transforming networks are broader band and less lossy when the do less drastic transformations. Going from 36 to 50 is better than 36 to 75.

As a result of this, most transmitters operating below about 30 MHz were designed for 50 ohm line way back around 1940 or so. By 1960 all of them were.

As time went on, VHF antennas used with low power transmitters were mostly ground plane and Udi types which motivated VHF transmitters to be designed for 50 ohm cable.
 

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