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i need 0-60V/10A DC voltage regulator

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Fahri

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Hi All,

i need 0-60V/10A DC voltage regulator.

thanks a lot for your help :eek:
 

Hishamsaleh

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use this circuit,,, you can get a variable voltage output depends on the value of R2 which you aligne... connect your output to voltmeter and align R2 to the value you need.

The components are:

R1: 270R
R2: 2K Cermet or carbon preset potentiometer
C1: 100nF
C2: 1uF tantalum
LM317T Voltage regulator
Heatsink
PCB board
 

E-design

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There is NO way that this circuit will do 10A. LM317T is rated at only 1.5A and 1.2-37v output.

You will need a regulator that uses a choppper as a pre-regulator and that will track the final linear regulator (with current boost to be able to handle 10A) to provide just enough input to this stage for it to still properly regulate. I have done this in the past but it is not a simple design and requires a good knowledge of switching supplies, stability compensation etc. This is the method used by most high power variable supplies from HP, Motorola etc.

My suggestion is to look at application notes of companies such as SGS Thompson. I used one of their L series regulators as a basis for my tracking pre-regulator. Better still if you can get hold of diagrams from some of the older high capacity power supplies from HP, is a good source to understand the working of these circuits.

E
 

jzaghal

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Hi,

Can't see why a 317 cannot be used for 0 - 60V @ 10A

You can build 2 PSU's to cover 0 - 30V ( Check for apps from Motorola ) .
Add the two in series for 60V max.
As for the 10Amps you can always parallel the 317 to obtain the
current you desire. Example to obtain 6A parallel 4 pcs of 317.

Hope this is clear. :twisted: :twisted:
 

nec3

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Theoreticaly you can use lm317's in the way you say and obtain 10 A's at 60 volts.But I dont think it would be productive.If it were constant voltaj it wasnt going to be any problem .He says 0-60 v.
62-0=62
62x10=620 W plus losses in transformator and the other passives...
And you have an oven...
 

solvarg

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shogun

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Using multiple LM317's in parallel is not good engineering practise. If you do decide to use the LM317 you should use multiple series pass transistors with proper current limiting protection, hence what you thought would be a good simple design will be come more complicated. There are several good books on this subject as well as several good application notes as well.
 

S

sick_man

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the best solution for 60 amps
i take it it is 100 duty cycle you need

is too use a switched mode design

any analoge supply
will need a massive transformer and a huge burning regulator stage

this is what i call bad practice

instead a well smoothed and regulated switched mode

is usefull

also use copper bars much like stuff for car audio
to carry such currents

60 amps is over 800watts at 13.8 v

lots of energy

so use switched mode

and a good design

or better is to aquire a supply from diawa or another radio amature equipement makers

these supplies show on cross needles and give 100% duty cycle
using japanese transistor flat packs
are very reliable
but a little expensive
are the best solution for an analoge supply

unless you want to use 25 2n3055's
 
S

sick_man

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after re reading the original post

Hi All,

i need 0-60V/10A DC voltage regulator.

thanks a lot for your help


you can use 6 2n3055s to make this

but better is too stick to a switched mode

as this will be 100% duty

where as any passive pass type stage will only ever be 25 - 50 % duty

unless you over rate all parts by a factor of 3 times max used by peek current and voltage set at 60 v
 

E-design

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Switchmodes are the obvious answer if you can live with the wide-band noise they generate. Also it is not easy to make a switcher variable over a wide voltage/current range and still maintain regulation and efficiency. This is one of the reasons why high capacity supplies from the big names are so bulky. Almost all of them will use a HF pre-chopper or 2 SCR's phase-controlled in 2 of the arms of the bridge rectifier to do the hard work as stated in my previous post and then use linear regulators as the final output for low noise. Also the transient response of a switcher is much slower than a linear regulator.

E
 

xhunter911

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Hishamsaleh said:
use this circuit,,, you can get a variable voltage output depends on the value of R2 which you aligne... connect your output to voltmeter and align R2 to the value you need.

The components are:

R1: 270R
R2: 2K Cermet or carbon preset potentiometer
C1: 100nF
C2: 1uF tantalum
LM317T Voltage regulator
Heatsink
PCB board
I have tried this schematic a couple times and had no kind of luck regulating a 320Amp leece Neville alternator... The alternator is externally rectified and ran directly to a set of seriesd 8Volt deep cycle batteries making it 16VDC... I need to volt the regulator up to 20VDC for 5-10 second increments...
Can anyone help or suggest a project plan????

Thanks
 

misley

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Cluricaun, please, can You repost a full link to project you have had in your mind. Edaboard link you gave us is not completed...

Thank you.
 

funghome

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how about this one..
0-50V 1A..maybe can more than 1a...
 

rauol

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A triac preregulator in the primary scheme will be better, as the power is 600 watt. the primary triac can be a lower current device. you will need an isoltaed drive from secondory to primary to control the firing in such a way thet the Voltage differance acrose the Pass transistor is maintained at 3 volt.
This scheme can give a better efficiency, but has a lower Power Factor.:|
 

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