Continue to Site

Welcome to EDAboard.com

Welcome to our site! EDAboard.com is an international Electronics Discussion Forum focused on EDA software, circuits, schematics, books, theory, papers, asic, pld, 8051, DSP, Network, RF, Analog Design, PCB, Service Manuals... and a whole lot more! To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Building a Pitbike rectifier/ regulator to power 5V arduino

JohnnyGermany

Newbie
Joined
Mar 27, 2024
Messages
1
Helped
0
Reputation
0
Reaction score
0
Trophy points
1
Activity points
23
Hi!

I am new on this forum, Hi from Germany!

I want to power a 5V arduino circuit from my pitbike single phase stator and I want to build a shunt regulator for it. On the internet I found a schematic for a curcuit like that and my question is:

Would this circuit still be possible just by changing the zener diode to lower the output voltage and adding a capacitor for smoothing? I guess I would also need a load resistor for the magneto since the arduino wont draw much current and the coil would spike up to very high voltages without a load? There is no battery connected to the stator coil since the bike doesn`t have E start just the arduino curcuit.

Unloaded the stator outputs 6 to 80V depending on RPM.

The curcuit is from this Youtube Video:

Also added a picture from my stator type.

Thanks very much,

Johannes
 

Attachments

  • Shunt regulator.PNG
    Shunt regulator.PNG
    408.7 KB · Views: 47
  • Magneto.jpg
    Magneto.jpg
    80.5 KB · Views: 46
Hi,

I want to power a 5V arduino circuit from my pitbike single phase stator and I want to build a shunt regulator for it. On the internet I found a schematic for a curcuit like that and my question is:
Designing electronic circuits follows laws of physics and math.

Thus the first thing you need is an idea, then requirements and numbers for specification.
The idea is to power an Arduino circuit (btw: there are very different Arduino circuits around with different requirements)

Values: In your case:
* expected output voltage
* expected max output current
* operable input voltage range
* if there is: maybe frequency (range) or other values

Klaus
 
Also consider that a shunt regulator, although simple in design, can be very inefficient. Its own components have to use at least the difference between the highest and lowest current drawn by the Arduino circuit. A series regulator, ideally a switch mode one will be far more efficient. The simplest 5V shunt is an NPN transistor with a 4.3V Zener diode between its base and collector. For 3.3V use a 2.7V Zener diode.

Brian.
 

LaTeX Commands Quick-Menu:

Part and Inventory Search

Welcome to EDABoard.com

Sponsor

Back
Top