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What type of microphone

Palmer77

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Greetings All,

I recently discovered this professional forum site, when I was searching for some recommendations regarding microphones (Measurement or instrumental types E.g. Reference mic).

I was after microphones that are capable of recording from the audio band (human voice) to below infrasound. I wish to record the natural world around me, while also being able to record human voice as well.

(If they are capable of distance as well, that would be an benefit too).

Any help would be appreciated
 

BradtheRad

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to below infrasound. I wish to record the natural world around me, while also being able to record human voice as well.
20 Hz is regarded as the lowest frequency which we hear as audio. To pick up lower frequencies you can (supposedly) use a low pass filter and preamplifier. The aim is to avoid amplifying the everyday audio spectrum.
Microphones normally are constructed to pick up the audio range.

The natural world has ultrasound as well as infrasound. Questions have come up at this forum about detecting bats. Their squeaks are above human hearing range. However these can be translated electronically downward in frequency by a process called heterodyning. Bat detection projects for do-it-yourselfers can be found on the internet.
Perhaps heterodyning can translate low frequencies up into the human hearing range as well.

A large transducer might be handy for picking up low frequencies. Perhaps a woofer mounted in a cabinet so that sound impinges on only one side of the cone.
 

FvM

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Electrete condenser microphones have a quite linear frequency response over the audio range, e.g. 20 Hz to 20 kHz, even the cheap ones. But to record infrasound or ultrasound, you need profesional condensor microphones, as made e.g. by Brüel&Kjaer company.
 

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