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What experience required to start a startup fabless company in Electronics ?

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MahmoudHassan

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Hello

What experience required to make a startup fabless company in Electronics ?
I need what it needs from to start learning from now to make something like that in about 5 - 10 years
from technical and managerial point of views.
Most investors now put money in new ideas found in products but most of them in Embedded systems only and you can find them easily like cloud fund in Kickstarter.com but in semiconductors ?? how can I start a company like that ? do I need to start with a real product build from scratch ? and what experience needed ?

Thanks in advance
Your help is really appreciated :)

Best Regards,
Mahmoud
 

leo_o2

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Maybe it is good to study other's failure.
However, IC should not be good field for start-up.
 

dick_freebird

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You can start any company (over here) for a few hundred bucks
and a couple of forms. It's survival, that's trickier and wants the
skills.

You need to have an offering of value. For the shoestring startup
that's probably engineering services, until you can find or provide
the huge up front capital for fab runs, product development and
then to ride out a few years' worth of design-in cycle (at risk).
Engineering jobs, if you find the right ones, can take you a long
way (or all the way) through product development. This means
skill and luck in finding, qualifying, and landing customers /
opportunities that have as part of the plan, them buying end
product soon and over the long haul. As you might guess, these
kinds of jobs are more rare and more competed. So skills in
defining and pitching a program are valuable, and doing this
with zero track record on your own probably wants some skill
at creative writing.

It's often the curse, that small time startups only win jobs
that everybody else no-bid for good reason (technical or
customer). These may be jobs you regret winning, so be sure
you take them right (like, the impossible should always be
bid as cost-plus, indefinite delivery). Or, word the contract
so smartly that when things go sideways you have an "out"
and/or the right to change-of-scope (and the ability to do
some hard-nosed negotiating).
 

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