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Please help identify this connector?

treez

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Hi,
Please help to locate this connectors part number. (pic attached)
It is extremely poor. It is not a rising clamp type....when you put a wire end into it, you cannot get it back out! It is killing me when i am doing testing!
I need to find its part number so i can compare its price with better rising clamp type connectors. Then i will beg for it to be replaced.
It is 5.08mm pitch
15A rated
300VAC rated
 

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treez

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Thanks, i am still looking through Phoenix etc...the connector has like a springy bit of metal which gets bent down over the wire/ferrule to clamp it in the connector...then when one un-turns the screw, this bit of bendy metal is supposed to follow the screw back up, but it does not...it literally jams your ferrule in the connector...also it literally puts a barb in your wire or ferrule end so you cant pull it back out!!!

The only reason to use these would be cheapness, so i am trying to find out how cheap they are.

This connector has already ruined a day in the EMC lab as i couldnt change the board around as i couldnt disconnect it

Farnell's whole "Wire to board terminal block" range doesnt have it...

....its a real mystery connector....basically one time connect only, and untraceable
 

stenzer

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FvM

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when one un-turns the screw, this bit of bendy metal is supposed to follow the screw back up, but it does not...it literally jams your ferrule in the connector
When I remember right, it's a brass metal strip. Not elastic, it has to be bend back with a tool.
also it literally puts a barb in your wire or ferrule end so you cant pull it back out!!!
Sounds like you over-fastened the screw.

I came across this type of terminal blocks. I believe they are not so bad as described above, but I agree that they shouldn't be used in a quality design. I didn't order the parts myself, unfortunately I can't name a vendor or part number.

Don't think that it's of much use to identify the parts.
 
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ads-ee

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Thanks, the idea is to identify them, then find the price, then compare the price with other, better connectors.
Can you ask someone from your purchasing department? Someone had to have ordered the parts that were on the BOM, they would know who the manufacturer is and the price of the parts.
 
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treez

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Thanks, if they are cheaper, and they probably are, then they wont be interested in looking into it in the first place.
(i am just wondering on the off chance that they arent actually cheaper).
 

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If the type of testing you are doing now is an ongoing issue where an engineer, consultant, technician, etc has to extract the wires from these one-time use connectors (or at least they seem to appear to be). Then the costs of that need to be looked at and weighed against the cost of the connectors.

e.g. suppose it takes ~10 minutes to extract the wires from the connector and the person doing this is making $50/hr. That means to remove the wire (which would take a few seconds with a better connector) just cost the company $8.33 to have them remove the wire from the connector. If the production of this board is 10,000 units a month and the failure rate is 2% then you would expect approximately 200 units non functional units. This means 2000 minutes may be required the removal of the wire on all of the units or $16,666 of direct labor cost. If the cost of the connector is $0.10 difference then the production run would cost $1000 more. The connector cost difference would have to be greater than $1.67 to exceed the labor cost of removing the wire.

Now this is a very simplified example (ignoring a lot of overhead costs) that may (or may not) be representative of your situation. But if you can prove to the company that swapping the connector is more than a convenience for you, but saves the company more money then you can justify the switch to a potentially more expensive connector. Of course this is assuming that out of the 200 units that the majority are repairable, and only a small fraction end up in the bone pile that gets scrapped.

I've seen some situations where an inexpensive board is being worked on for days with labor costs in the $1000 on a board that costs <$100. This usually happens when some short sighted decision was made to not build more units than needed (with the expectation of failures) to save "costs", which end up costing the company more money in labor costs (and in other work not getting done) than they "saved" by not having a larger production run. If this board you are working on is in this category then suck it up and just take the money (as a consultant) and spend the extra time extracting the wires, because if they realize you are costing them more money than the board is worth, then you'll be out of a job. ;)
 
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dick_freebird

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Have you investigated whether there is a pin extractor tool
meant for these connectors (as is the case for many
automotive connectors, expected to be serviced rather
than replacing a full-body harness)? If you find one then
you may either buy it or copy it (like Molex connectors
you just need a length of proper-diameter thin wall tubing).

Or, maybe you really need a bit of assembler training
on how hard to crimp stuff, so that it's not pre-munged
in production.
 

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