Welcome to EDAboard.com

Welcome to our site! EDAboard.com is an international Electronic Discussion Forum focused on EDA software, circuits, schematics, books, theory, papers, asic, pld, 8051, DSP, Network, RF, Analog Design, PCB, Service Manuals... and a whole lot more! To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Playing with radio parts...

Status
Not open for further replies.

kakadas

Newbie level 1
Joined
May 1, 2013
Messages
1
Helped
0
Reputation
0
Reaction score
0
Trophy points
1,281
Activity points
1,296
Hello,

I just recently took apart a radio. I wanted to make a FM transmitter of it...

Sadly my hopes were crushed as I had no knowledge about how to make one (apart from the knowledge that my Physics book provides me...) nor do I have the parts at my hand to make one. (I don't even have a solder...).

So here I am - a newbie wanting to make, learn and discover something that I find fun.

Luckily I have another idea that might work. I have a speaker from that very same radio, and I though that it would be cool to make sounds (like really play notes).

As far as I know, simply hooking a speaker to a battery (DC current) won't do nothing much (apart from some basic bumps). I believe that I need to generate somewhat of a AC current so that my speaker's diaphragm would vibrate somewhat according to the frequency of the current. The only way I could do that is by connecting a coil to my speaker.

I just want to know if I'm thinking the right way.

I would appreciate any suggestions, recommendations or useful resources on the subject.
 

chuckey

Advanced Member level 5
Joined
Dec 26, 2010
Messages
4,863
Helped
1,308
Reputation
2,622
Reaction score
1,283
Trophy points
1,393
Location
Southampton and holiday cottage in Wensleydale (UK
Activity points
31,695
I would reconnect your loudspeaker to the radio set as it contains an audio amplifier, which you can gain access to by feeding in an audio signal across the volume control. this would be a good point to inject an electronic signal.
If you want to experiment with electronics, a soldering iron, some small tools and a DVM are the bare minimum requirements.
Frank
 

albert22

Full Member level 6
Joined
Jul 20, 2004
Messages
333
Helped
68
Reputation
136
Reaction score
65
Trophy points
1,308
Activity points
5,005
I advise you to get a book or search the web for an online course like "getting started in electronics". There you will build small projects and learn what tools you need and how to use them. And how to identify and measure components.
Without soldering is not much that can be done but you can get a breadboard to build simple circuits:
http://www.technologystudent.com/elec1/bread1.htm
Also my advise is: Try to get new components like transistors, resistors, capacitiors... because it is easier to place them in the breadboard. They are cheap and you are sure that work. Desoldering components from a radio requires a soldering iron and a "solder sucker" or "solder wick" and some practice.
Check youtube there are a lot of simple projects and soldering lessons.
Have fun.
 

spudboy488

Full Member level 5
Joined
Oct 10, 2012
Messages
272
Helped
69
Reputation
140
Reaction score
75
Trophy points
1,308
Activity points
3,055
You can also download a simulator to draw schematics and simulate circuits. Analog Devices has a version of Multisim (http://www.analog.com/en/amplifier-linear-tools/multisim/topic.html) that has a lot of basic components as well as a bunch of Analog Devices parts. It has a built DMM, oscilloscope, and various other pieces of test equipment. It's a good way to learn without having the physical parts/tools.
 

albert22

Full Member level 6
Joined
Jul 20, 2004
Messages
333
Helped
68
Reputation
136
Reaction score
65
Trophy points
1,308
Activity points
5,005
In addition to the simulators. Once you get the basis you may find useful the PC based generators, oscilloscopes and others. That only require a sound card to operate. Some are free
For example
http://www.sillanumsoft.org/
A simple experiment would be to connect the speaker of your defunct radio to the sound card oscilloscope and see what happens when you talk or sing on the waveform and the spectrum analyzer.
Dont worry It would not complain if you sing bad.
Just take care. Try to know what you are doing or you may blow your soundcard. The microphone input may require a capacitor in series with the speaker I would rather use the line in.
 

Status
Not open for further replies.

Part and Inventory Search

Welcome to EDABoard.com

Sponsor

Top