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Lead acid battery charger circuit require

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P1981

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Can any body give me 180AH lead acid battery charger circuit with float and boost feature and auto cut off when charged
 

Can any body give me 180AH lead acid battery charger circuit with float and boost feature and auto cut off when charged

Step down the mains to 15V or 16V AC using a LARGE transformer. Rectify to DC and filter. Use a regulator circuit to regulate to either 13.5V or 14.4V depending on the battery voltage level which is detected by another comparator-based circuit. There is an active switch in the path that is on during charging and turned off when the comparator circuit detects that battery has been fully charged.

This is one method. There are many other methods. Construct one for lower capacity first. Then scale up.
 

Can i use this circuit
 

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  • L296 battery charger.png
    L296 battery charger.png
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I suspect the L296 circuit performs a taper charge. The idea is to reduce the charge rate as the battery reaches near full. This allows the battery temperature to settle down, while permitting it to absorb maximum charge. It is preferable to making the battery rise to over 15 or 16 V, then shutting off the charge.

To charge my batteries from my solar panels, I constructed a circuit which performs an in-between method. Turn off charge when the battery reaches 14.4V, wait for the battery to settle below 13.4V, then turn on charging again. Cycle indefinitely this way.

Simulation screenshot:



It shows a transistor as the switching device but a mosfet is suitable.

The zener value is 5V but it can be almost anything up to 12 V.
 

Tahmid bro
Can i use this atteched circuit to charge a lead acid battery . Please tell me any other modification in this circuit.Thanks.
 

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  • Pulse charger.gif
    Pulse charger.gif
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can some one you explain this circuit plz
 

can some one you explain this circuit plz

The N-mosfet is on the low side (near ground). The mosfet is controlled by one op amp. That op amp in turn is influenced by the other op amps.

The schematic contains the words 'pulse-charger' in the name, so I suppose it sends pulses of current to charge the battery.

The bottom section produces bipolar supplies for the op amps.

The potentiometers are to adjust the charge rate, and how to alter charge rate depending on battery voltage.
 

BradtheRad : thanks for the detail .. now i am following this topology and i thing its better ? what you say ?
http://danyk.cz/nab_ab_en.html

It is a switching topology, using an IC called UC3842.
The switching method looks very sensible. It is likely to be more efficient than the simpler analog method.

The article appears well done. It has sufficient instructions and photographs.

The IC offers a big benefit because it replaces a number of components.

However it is exposed to mains AC, therefore it's a good idea to purchase a few of them, because we all know how easy it is for mistakes to happen!

Notice the warning it gives: "Switching supply is not for beginners".

Suppose it does not work right the first time you apply power. Then it will be difficult to troubleshoot. Many of the components are exposed to high voltage. Between setting your meter to check voltage and then to check current, there is a lot of opportunity to blow up your meter.

If you find the IC-based charger does not work, then be prepared to try another topology made from simpler components.

As you can see there are many battery charging circuits on the internet. And many different charging regimens, etc. It's a lot to take in. Even more difficult to look at a schematic and say whether it has any shortcomings.

You'll want to weigh factors such as expense, complexity, ease of building, ease of troubleshooting.
 

thanks for the detail response . . above charger can charge max upto 2-3 amp . . i want to charge battery of 200Ah . is there any other way in switching topology to achieve this ??
 

thanks for the detail response . . above charger can charge max upto 2-3 amp . . i want to charge battery of 200Ah . is there any other way in switching topology to achieve this ??

A safe charge rate is typically C * 1/10 (where C is Amp-hour capacity).

That works out to 10 hours to fully charge the battery.

Therefore with a capacity of 200 AHrs, a suitable charge rate is 20 A. It can be more. It can be less.

It depends on how much charging time you can allow.
Also on how powerful and expensive you wish the transformer to be.

I believe you want a faster charge rate than 2-3 A.

I don't think you should try to scale up the danyk.cz design. Look for a design that has been shown to be successful with a battery of the same size you have.
 

i found current mode pwm chip i thing it is better then uc3842 . . what you say ?? see the attachments
 

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  • OB2354_PDF, pwm controller in volt phreak-1.pdf
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i found current mode pwm chip i thing it is better then uc3842 . . what you say ?? see the attachments

The datasheet states the OB2354 is designed for sub-20W power range. This sounds too low for your purposes. You need a circuit which draws about 320 W. This amounts to 1.5 A of 220V mains AC.

It gives a list of applications. These are in a lower power range than you need. (Even though the list contains 'battery charger'.) I believe these would draw a fraction of an ampere at 220 VAC.

This IC does not appear powerful enough to charge a 200 AH battery, unless you can find a project which shows you exactly how to do so. It might require the addition of more components, to handle the power.
 

what is you battery specification ?? it will charge your battery aprox @1amp
 

hey guys i am also looking for same i found common circuit for same as follow.
https://renewablekinabalu.blogspot.in/2013/07/homemade-12v-sealed-lead-acid-battery.html

will it work??

The charger is based on a 317 adjustable voltage regulator.
It is set to provide 1 A charge rate.

The instructions say to set its volt level at 14.2 V, so that it does not continue to charge a battery above that. This is proper for a 12V battery.

The charger is satisfactory for a battery capacity of about 10 Amp-hours. Common advice says that C/10 is a suitable charge rate. The photograph shows a 7 AH battery which is about right for this charger.
 

here is my battery
battery.jpg
 

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  • LM317 12V battery charger.png
    LM317 12V battery charger.png
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Last edited:

here is my battery

The label says capacity is 1.2 AHrs.

It says charging current should not exceed .36 A. (This equals a charge rate of C x .3)

The charger linked in post #15 puts out 1A. This is too much current, and it needs to be reduced (to a value of C x .1, or C x .2).

Current can be limited by installing an inline resistor.
 

here is my modified circuit
modified.png

here i consider 14Volt as input and as you told 0.3 A current as output so i using V=IR
R = 50 ohm

right??
 

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