Welcome to EDAboard.com

Welcome to our site! EDAboard.com is an international Electronic Discussion Forum focused on EDA software, circuits, schematics, books, theory, papers, asic, pld, 8051, DSP, Network, RF, Analog Design, PCB, Service Manuals... and a whole lot more! To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Register Log in

Advice on breaking into the industry?

jayeshshetty

Newbie
Joined
Jul 3, 2020
Messages
1
Helped
0
Reputation
0
Reaction score
0
Trophy points
1
Activity points
13
I'm currently a junior in school. Last semester I took an FPGA based digital design course, and I loved it. My internship search has been unfruitful so far (could be worse, I'm on the 4.5 year plan so I'll have one more summer to get one). I might end up having a lot of time this summer, and I want to put it to good use. Right now I am thinking of making the Commodore 64. For people currently in the industry, what did you do during school that you thought really helped you land a job? Thanks for your time!
 

TrickyDicky

Advanced Member level 5
Joined
Jun 7, 2010
Messages
7,001
Helped
2,056
Reputation
4,129
Reaction score
2,006
Trophy points
1,393
Activity points
38,424
An electronic engineering degree will get you in - you can usually do firmware or software with it.
 

danadakk

Full Member level 4
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
199
Helped
29
Reputation
57
Reaction score
25
Trophy points
28
Activity points
1,013
Spent spare time building music synthesizers out of TTL logic and analog,
then doing some processor work, and coding.

Tons of reading, Circuit design articles and ap notes. And simple breadboard
experimenting.


Regards, Dana.
 

dick_freebird

Advanced Member level 5
Joined
Mar 4, 2008
Messages
6,758
Helped
1,990
Reputation
3,984
Reaction score
1,815
Trophy points
1,393
Location
USA
Activity points
54,196
If you can find a part-time electronic technician job,
that would beat a self-directed hobby (for starters,
you can't put yourself down as a resume employer
reference).

My path was child hobbyist, Radio Shack salesman,
technician (these, during college), and recruited
into the semiconductor industry as a design engineer.
The technician experience I noticed seemed to get
the recruiters' attention. The recruiters were all lead
or principal engineer types who had ideas about skill
set and inclination, that a HR flunky would not. My
grades were barely enough to keep their interest,
and I had to stick to my goal of chip design while they
offered me a few less interesting roles (like being a
SRAM product engineer, which mostly involved making
sure the parts were coming out the right chute of the
temperature handler on third shift). Don't settle, because
you will soon enough be "typecast". One of my amigos
from school who had lower grades took the SRAM
PE job I passed on, hated it, went into management.

Small local companies in the electronics business
are more likely to have unadvertised needs than
"big names" who will also have a ton of applicants
for any opening. They may only pay minimum wage
or close to it (my first technician gig was $4.50 an
hour, back when minimum wage was about $2) but
that still beats an unpaid internship.

If your electronics schematic and soldering skills pass
inspection you can get a technician job somewhere.
Now it's a search and diligence problem.
 

Toggle Sidebar

Part and Inventory Search

Welcome to EDABoard.com

Sponsor

Top