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Wireless DALI: A Solution for Controlling Lights When Wires Can’t Be Used?

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Michael_S-R

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M.d.C. Technology recently completed a concept prototype for a wireless DALI interface. This could make it much easier to control lighting at far less expense and makes installation much quicker. It also permits greater opportunity for advanced temporary lighting solutions.

Currently, the Digital Addressable Lighting Interface standard (DALI) requires a wired connection between lights, switches, and a control panel. This allows enhanced control of lighting appliances including dimming, with connections next to but separated from electrical wiring. However, it adds extra wiring that must be installed, a problem for places such as older churches and historic buildings where it is an engineering challenge to install additional wiring or may have governmental limitations on what can be done.

Our wireless DALI device solves this problem. It allows the use of a DALI system without additional wiring, using 434 or 868 MHz bandwidths to send data between a control unit and DALI devices. There can also be several separated DALI networks in one area with low risk of interference to easily manipulate lighting conditions in a building. The device requires a power supply of 12-24 VDC, which also powers the DALI bus.

With a wireless DALI system, you no longer need the extra wiring or the engineering and construction work to install advanced light controls. This reduces costs for a system, makes it much more flexible, and also permits its use in a range of situations where a wired DALI network would not have made much sense.

For instance, many churches and historic buildings, especially in Europe, were built centuries before electric lighting. These buildings are difficult and expensive to modify to add lights and the extra wires that a wired DALI system requires. In many cases, historic preservation laws require government approval of any major changes to the building, a legal hurdle that makes it more expensive and take longer to install a wired DALI network, if not outright impossible to do so. Wireless DALI solves that problem by making a DALI network easier to install without additional wires. This is also useful for exhibitions or events in which a temporary light system is needed. It may not be feasible or desirable to rewire an entire building to support an evening event or even a short-term exhibit. A wireless DALI system would remove that problem and make it easier and less expensive to add advanced control of the lights. These are just some of the use cases we envision for wireless DALI lighting.

This system is, however, an early prototype. We are still working on how such a networked system might be used. How would you use such a solution? What sorts of situations would benefit from a wireless DALI system and what sort of criteria would you look for in deciding whether to use it? We want to hear from you in guiding us in the right direction to make this device effective.
 

directcontrol

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M.d.C. Technology recently completed a concept prototype for a wireless DALI interface. This could make it much easier to control lighting at far less expense and makes installation much quicker. It also permits greater opportunity for advanced temporary lighting solutions.

Currently, the Digital Addressable Lighting Interface standard (DALI) requires a wired connection between lights, switches, and a control panel. This allows enhanced control of lighting appliances including dimming, with connections next to but separated from electrical wiring. However, it adds extra wiring that must be installed, a problem for places such as older churches and historic buildings where it is an engineering challenge to install additional wiring or may have governmental limitations on what can be done.

Our wireless DALI device solves this problem. It allows the use of a DALI system without additional wiring, using 434 or 868 MHz bandwidths to send data between a control unit and DALI devices. There can also be several separated DALI networks in one area with low risk of interference to easily manipulate lighting conditions in a building. The device requires a power supply of 12-24 VDC, which also powers the DALI bus.

With a wireless DALI system, you no longer need the extra wiring or the engineering and construction work to install advanced light controls. This reduces costs for a system, makes it much more flexible, and also permits its use in a range of situations where a wired DALI network would not have made much sense.

For instance, many churches and historic buildings, especially in Europe, were built centuries before electric lighting. These buildings are difficult and expensive to modify to add lights and the extra wires that a wired DALI system requires. In many cases, historic preservation laws require government approval of any major changes to the building, a legal hurdle that makes it more expensive and take longer to install a wired DALI network, if not outright impossible to do so. Wireless DALI solves that problem by making a DALI network easier to install without additional wires. This is also useful for exhibitions or events in which a temporary light system is needed. It may not be feasible or desirable to rewire an entire building to support an evening event or even a short-term exhibit. A wireless DALI system would remove that problem and make it easier and less expensive to add advanced control of the lights. These are just some of the use cases we envision for wireless DALI lighting.

This system is, however, an early prototype. We are still working on how such a networked system might be used. How would you use such a solution? What sorts of situations would benefit from a wireless DALI system and what sort of criteria would you look for in deciding whether to use it? We want to hear from you in guiding us in the right direction to make this device effective.
Please contact me here or by email for more information about this. We are searching for wireless DALI solutions. Regards Michael
 

alexz

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What other values does wireless DALI add to wired DALI?

Does it have to be DALI in a wireless network at all?

What is the wireless technology and topology you use?

How would this work with other wireless DALI systems?
 

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