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Power supply suggestions

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thule

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Hi

I am trying to find a high voltage DC power supply. What I am trying to do is to pole some PVDF - first form it in the shape of a rod, then heat to 100c+stretch+apply DC bias across it so that it shifts to beta form for the piezoelectric effect.

I have been trying to find sources of high voltage DC for the same purpose. Unfortunately the poling requires pretty high voltage - 1million volts per meter. I can pole it in short segments but will still need around 6-10kv dc.

I have been looking around for the same and came up with the following options - flyback transformers, neon sign transformers and the rather promising items below.

https://www.amazon.com/Step-up-Module-High-voltage-Generator-400000V/dp/B00JVJDEZE/ref=pd_cp_pc_0

https://www.amazon.com/7000V-Step-u...d_sim_e_2?ie=UTF8&refRID=14EGKV0J0V5GZ9HCJXC2


I guess I don't need a lot of current and mostly need pretty high potential difference. I am leaning towards the bottom two since they seem to be battery powered and just feels less lethal :grin:

Also - please correct my calculation of power draw on neon sign transformers - if a 15000v and 30ma neon sign transformer is connected to mains, won't it draw (15000*30)/1000=600A !

Any suggestions for such a power source will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
 

KlausST

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Hi,

(15000*30)/1000=600A !
There are two mistakes.
1) Voltage x current never gives current again.
2) Your mathematics is wrong

Klaus
 

thule

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Of course. Doh! That is so obvious now that you mentioned it ..

Thanks
 

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