Continue to Site

Welcome to EDAboard.com

Welcome to our site! EDAboard.com is an international Electronics Discussion Forum focused on EDA software, circuits, schematics, books, theory, papers, asic, pld, 8051, DSP, Network, RF, Analog Design, PCB, Service Manuals... and a whole lot more! To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Power Supply operating frequency

Status
Not open for further replies.

saumya_85

Advanced Member level 4
Joined
Mar 18, 2009
Messages
107
Helped
6
Reputation
12
Reaction score
5
Trophy points
1,298
Location
INDIA
Activity points
1,948
Power supply operates at 55KHz. What does it mean?

I think, It gives DC out put at 55KHz. Am I correct?
 

A power supply operating at 55 kHz refers to the switching frequency of the (switching) voltage supply regulator. There are two basic types of voltage regulators: linear and switching regulators. A basic switching regulator is some combination of diodes, capacitors, transistor switches and inductors. The speed and duty cycle of the transistor switches determine the DC output value. For your case, the transistors switch at 55 kHz. The power supply gives out a DC output. That means there is not any frequency except for the voltage ripple in the output.

See the book called "Switching Power Supply Design" by Abraham Pressman.

hope that helps,
Matthew
 
  • Like
Reactions: tiger135

    tiger135

    Points: 2
    Helpful Answer Positive Rating
    V

    Points: 2
    Helpful Answer Positive Rating
The 55KHz is the switching frequency of the internal circuit of power supply. The DC output will be filtered and will be DC, ie:0Hz.
 
Here I have attached the schematic. It Viper20 based PSU.
I want to measure switching frequency.

Which point I should measure.
 

Attachments

  • Viper.JPG
    Viper.JPG
    53.6 KB · Views: 94
Last edited:

Use a scope with the probe on SW and the ground clip on Ground.

---------- Post added at 18:15 ---------- Previous post was at 18:15 ----------

Use a scope with the probe on SW and the ground clip on RTN. (Ground).
 
A higher switching frequency permits using smaller components. Particularly the coil. Thus the supply costs less to manufacture.

The designer constructs the prototype circuit. Then he adjusts it to yield maximum current output. One way is to use a high enough frequency to get maximum throughput of joules in and out of the inductor.
 
A higher switching frequency permits using smaller components...

The concepts is like energy-packs.
At higher switching frequencies coil require carry less energy per time.

+++
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Part and Inventory Search

Welcome to EDABoard.com

Sponsor

Back
Top