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Pogo pin test board design

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DanTheMan

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I'm trying to design a motherboard test board based on a 62 mil FR4 PCB. The device to be tested is a BGA-type PCB which is 40 mil FR4 and which has BGA balls on a non-standard pitch of 2 mm.

Since the pitch of 2 mm is non-standard I cannot seem to find a socket that will accommodate test pins (such as pogo pins) on this pitch. Therefore, I was thinking that short pogo pins could be soldered down on one side to the 62 mil motherboard PCB (probably through carefully sized via holes that match the module 2 mm pitch) and then the module itself could be seated on top of the pogo pins.

Any ideas whether this could work or whether there are any other methods?

Thank you!
 

marce

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Have a look at The Peak Group - Peak Test - Home.
What I have done before is solder test pin recepticles into the board, then fastened the test pins into the recepticles. Then when a test pin breaks you can replace it easily, and they do break. A tip the tech guys at peak gave us was if possible hold the board being tested flat and move the pins up to the board on a moving base and with a vertical motion, this prolongs the life of the test probes but makes for quite an expensive rig. Also you have to hold the board being tested down for the length of the test without putting undue or irregular stress on the board or the solder balls.
I have built test fixtures in house in the past, BUT:
Found it took up loads of time and was quite hard to design and build, days on a CNC machine cutting parts then assembling them. Nowadays I use Peak or Multex to design and build the test rigs.
 

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