Welcome to EDAboard.com

Welcome to our site! EDAboard.com is an international Electronic Discussion Forum focused on EDA software, circuits, schematics, books, theory, papers, asic, pld, 8051, DSP, Network, RF, Analog Design, PCB, Service Manuals... and a whole lot more! To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Register Log in

Need help to be an Engineer

Status
Not open for further replies.

bittersweetsep

Newbie level 4
Joined
Nov 28, 2012
Messages
7
Helped
0
Reputation
0
Reaction score
0
Trophy points
1,281
Activity points
1,350
Hi everybody,
I am in the phase of seeking for an entry-level Microelectronics engineer job. And basically my everyday job is to check the jobs and send out resume to the proper ones, which requires not so much time. So I wanna use the left time for self-learning, could anybody please give me some suggestions to improve myself like some books, free software for simulation or layouts, or some tutorials? Since it should be a start job for me, and there are some different directions in this field like analog engineer, digital/ASIC engineer, physical design engineer, IC layout engineer , I am kind of lost and I don't know which way I should go. Actually it looks like there are quite a few working opportunities for a new-grad like me recently, it is very frustrating and sometimes I even thought to give up to change an area. Sorry to make you see my complaints, and hope you have a good career. Thanks.
 

crutschow

Advanced Member level 5
Joined
Feb 22, 2012
Messages
3,788
Helped
903
Reputation
1,804
Reaction score
888
Trophy points
1,393
Location
L.A. USA Zulu -8
Activity points
21,344
What technical courses did you study for your degree?

Also, good technical writing is a must to be a good engineer. So avoid slang words like wanna. Also be clear in what you state. For example you said "Actually it looks like there are quite a few working opportunities for a new-grad like me recently, it is very frustrating and sometimes I even thought to give up to change an area." which makes little sense unless you meant "Actually it looks like there are few working opportunities for a new-grad...."
 

Cyrus the Great

Member level 4
Joined
Oct 30, 2011
Messages
79
Helped
4
Reputation
8
Reaction score
4
Trophy points
1,298
Location
IRAN
Activity points
1,765
Hi dear friend.you can fine all your answer in a book which called Practical Electronics for Inventors.I bought it and in my idea its PERFECT.
Best Regard
 

bittersweetsep

Newbie level 4
Joined
Nov 28, 2012
Messages
7
Helped
0
Reputation
0
Reaction score
0
Trophy points
1,281
Activity points
1,350
Sorry for my poor writing. I took nano-structure materials, fund solid state devices, Analog circuit, nanotechnology & science, Microelectronics device fabrication, semiconductor materials and so on.

- - - Updated - - -

Hi dear friend.you can fine all your answer in a book which called Practical Electronics for Inventors.I bought it and in my idea its PERFECT.
Best Regard
Thank you for your kind reply.
 

ElectronicsRookie

Member level 1
Joined
Oct 22, 2011
Messages
38
Helped
2
Reputation
4
Reaction score
2
Trophy points
1,288
Activity points
1,614
Sorry for my poor writing. I took nano-structure materials, fund solid state devices, Analog circuit, nanotechnology & science, Microelectronics device fabrication, semiconductor materials and so on.

- - - Updated - - -



Thank you for your kind reply.
It all depends where you are. Otherwise, you may have move out to a better place. Best place to start is with a start up company.
 

crutschow

Advanced Member level 5
Joined
Feb 22, 2012
Messages
3,788
Helped
903
Reputation
1,804
Reaction score
888
Trophy points
1,393
Location
L.A. USA Zulu -8
Activity points
21,344
Sorry for my poor writing. I took nano-structure materials, fund solid state devices, Analog circuit, nanotechnology & science, Microelectronics device fabrication, semiconductor materials and so on.
You don't have poor writing (many on these forums do much worse), just less than rigorous, which is needed for technical writing. It's a big turn-off if you have any of those in your resume. You might have someone else double-check for any English errors (unless of course you are applying in some other language).

I'm not sure that start-ups are a good bet for finding a job since they usually operate on a tight budget and don't have time to train new engineers. The generally want someone with experience who can hit the ground running. I think it would be better to look for a job in a larger, well-established company, who are looking for new (read cheap) engineers. Try to customize you resume for the jobs the company might be interested in (do some company research), emphasizing your training that is applicable to what they do. Companies don't often advertise for inexperienced engineers so you have to kind of go in cold. Doesn't you school offer job placement help?

As far as additional learning, I would emphasize subjects in the field you interested in entering. Check the job listings to see what type of engineering specialties the companies are looking for.
 

kabeer02

Full Member level 5
Joined
Nov 23, 2012
Messages
301
Helped
57
Reputation
114
Reaction score
54
Trophy points
1,308
Location
yamasukro
Activity points
2,475
what are you trying yo say? do you want to learn or you are seeking for job to do?
 

dick_freebird

Advanced Member level 5
Joined
Mar 4, 2008
Messages
7,030
Helped
2,055
Reputation
4,114
Reaction score
1,901
Trophy points
1,393
Location
USA
Activity points
56,345
Major semiconductor companies used to be the plum
jobs out of college; a big company will be more able
to tolerate the expense of developing wet clay into
useful talent, and the attrition along the way. But
the problem there is, much of that has moved to
places you maybe don't want to be (but then, it is
an international forum and there's something for
everybody). Another unfortunate development is
the fabless model; the foundries don't do design,
and the design shops don't need device physicists
too much, so you can't get inside one decent
company and rattle around picking up a broad skill
set like some of us semi-old-timers.

I recommend that you "follow your enthusiasm" -
look at the trade mags for stuff you think is "cool"
and would like to work on, and make that your
cover-letter pitch. Employers want motivated
people who want to do the work they have going,
not someone to daydream while looking for their
next job. If they see reasonably relevant course
work, and genuine enthusiasm for their business,
that's a reason to talk. And you have something
then to talk about, as far as "why?".
 

bittersweetsep

Newbie level 4
Joined
Nov 28, 2012
Messages
7
Helped
0
Reputation
0
Reaction score
0
Trophy points
1,281
Activity points
1,350
Thanks for your kind help and reply. I think first of all I should have a determined mind. I am a new immigrant and the place I live now doesn't have so much work opportunities in the semi-industry. Sometimes, I could not send out a copy of my resume for the whole week. When I was frustrated by that, I just swayed and wondered if I should still hang on. Also, my academic background makes me feel embarrassed. I had 2 EE Master Degrees, which did not help me become competitive, however, since I do not have much practical experience, it made even harder for some technician/technologist positions. Some job hunters would call me when they saw my resumes online, but all the jobs they provided to me were senior engineer or lead/principle engineer level which I could not to be qualified. So embarrassed.
 

ElectronicsRookie

Member level 1
Joined
Oct 22, 2011
Messages
38
Helped
2
Reputation
4
Reaction score
2
Trophy points
1,288
Activity points
1,614
Look, I have a degree in semiconductors and optics too (and no masters). I did not get a job in my field. In a matter of fact, I started with anything to earn living. 20 years passed by, and I am in manufacturing working as a general worker/technician, but at least I make a living. My engineering skills are obsolete now. I suggest that you should make decision base on your economic situation. If you still have some cash, go South Korea, Japan, California or even China. If you are in U.S. look for small start up companies. Otherwise, grab any job to stay afloat.
Your have two Masters, then you should be a 'French Vanilla ' for recruiters.
 

bittersweetsep

Newbie level 4
Joined
Nov 28, 2012
Messages
7
Helped
0
Reputation
0
Reaction score
0
Trophy points
1,281
Activity points
1,350
Look, I have a degree in semiconductors and optics too (and no masters). I did not get a job in my field. In a matter of fact, I started with anything to earn living. 20 years passed by, and I am in manufacturing working as a general worker/technician, but at least I make a living. My engineering skills are obsolete now. I suggest that you should make decision base on your economic situation. If you still have some cash, go South Korea, Japan, California or even China. If you are in U.S. look for small start up companies. Otherwise, grab any job to stay afloat.
Your have two Masters, then you should be a 'French Vanilla ' for recruiters.
I am kind of being caught in the dilemma. I have to stay the place where has not so much opportunities in my area. I am scared when I think I may end up forgetting all the stuff I learned in the University, and living my life in some other field which is not related with the EE. I don't mean how much I love this major, I even hated sometimes when I was in the school, until I feared I would lose it.
 

Status
Not open for further replies.
Toggle Sidebar

Part and Inventory Search

Welcome to EDABoard.com

Sponsor

Top