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High-temperature microcontroller

Ifgad

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Hello everyone,

I am looking for a microcontroller to replace a Teensy 4.0. The problem is that the Teensy doesn't cope well with high temperatures.

The specifications I'm looking for are as follows:
- High maximum operating temperature, at least 125 degrees Celsius
- Minimum 13-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC)
- Capable of handling 1000Hz data sampling and high-frequency data shaping (~200Hz)
- Multiple analog inputs
- Serial communication
- Powered at 5V or less (preferably the minimum)
- I'd prefer to be able to download Arduino code onto it, or else in C
- Requires a simple assembly, not too many components

Many thanks to all
 
Automotive grade may get you 125C. MIL certainly
but you won't like it ($ at best, ITAR at worst).

Since you want a lot of specific features I'd start there,
find vendors with what you want in any grade, and then
look for higher-temp-tested grades (may test all temps
and bin out the best for the industrial, automotive, MIL
and space markets).

ST does a lot of Euro mil / aero and automotive
business and I believe has processors, no idea
about accessories. 3DIC and Cissoid I think have
had high temp uCs but nothing so feature-heavy,
as far as I've seen - though I've fallen off the high
temp hobby-horse and don't keep up really.

What is the specific temperature related problem with
this "Teensy"? Latchup? Just built in logic race or
hang-with-the-clock at low V, high T? Depending on
the problems and the present device construction a
fix might be as simple as asking for the next lot to
run on epi starting material instead of minimum-cost
plain bulk wafers. Or maybe you'd be fine if you could
only lower the clock frequency 20%.

"If you can't be with the one you love,
Love the one you're with"....
 
Hello!

This one goes to 160 degrees:
HT = High temperature.
I have used many MSP430s. The ADC is 12 bits only, but if you can afford to sample
at higher speed, you can get more bits.
Example: if you sample at 4 kHz instead of 1, you can get 1 extra bit.
And this is feasible with a 2619, I did it. Not with a HT device, but with a plain 2619.
I think it was 8 kHz sampling.

Edit: By the way, I forgot to mention that you can sample by bursts of 16 samples.
For example if you sample at 16 kHz, you will get one bunch of equally spaced samples
every ms. This happens automatically and you get an interrupt when your samples are ready.
From there you can calculate one 14-bit sample.

Dora


Hello everyone,

I am looking for a microcontroller to replace a Teensy 4.0. The problem is that the Teensy doesn't cope well with high temperatures.

The specifications I'm looking for are as follows:
- High maximum operating temperature, at least 125 degrees Celsius
- Minimum 13-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC)
- Capable of handling 1000Hz data sampling and high-frequency data shaping (~200Hz)
- Multiple analog inputs
- Serial communication
- Powered at 5V or less (preferably the minimum)
- I'd prefer to be able to download Arduino code onto it, or else in C
- Requires a simple assembly, not too many components

Many thanks to all
 
Cypress PSOC 4, can support temp range, handle 16 muxed (onchip) channels,
maybe more depending on package selection, routable internally and out to pins,
ARM core. Example of 8 channels (I did not do the routing buts its simple). Example
shown is 187K SPS per channel.

Routable on / off chip, single chip. Attachments show example and general family
onchip resources. This part is a subset.

Compiler and IDE (PSOC Creator) free.


Regards, Dana.
 

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Last edited:
Automotive grade may get you 125C. MIL certainly
but you won't like it ($ at best, ITAR at worst).

Since you want a lot of specific features I'd start there,
find vendors with what you want in any grade, and then
look for higher-temp-tested grades (may test all temps
and bin out the best for the industrial, automotive, MIL
and space markets).

ST does a lot of Euro mil / aero and automotive
business and I believe has processors, no idea
about accessories. 3DIC and Cissoid I think have
had high temp uCs but nothing so feature-heavy,
as far as I've seen - though I've fallen off the high
temp hobby-horse and don't keep up really.

What is the specific temperature related problem with
this "Teensy"? Latchup? Just built in logic race or
hang-with-the-clock at low V, high T? Depending on
the problems and the present device construction a
fix might be as simple as asking for the next lot to
run on epi starting material instead of minimum-cost
plain bulk wafers. Or maybe you'd be fine if you could
only lower the clock frequency 20%.

"If you can't be with the one you love,
Love the one you're with"....
Thank you for your reply.
The Teensy stops completely when the temperature limit is reached.
I have lowered the clock frequency to the minimum (from 600MHz to 24MHz!) and this has improved this limit but still not enough. It's stopped at 85°C so it's missing about 15°C for my application.
 
Hello!

This one goes to 160 degrees:
HT = High temperature.
I have used many MSP430s. The ADC is 12 bits only, but if you can afford to sample
at higher speed, you can get more bits.
Example: if you sample at 4 kHz instead of 1, you can get 1 extra bit.
And this is feasible with a 2619, I did it. Not with a HT device, but with a plain 2619.
I think it was 8 kHz sampling.

Edit: By the way, I forgot to mention that you can sample by bursts of 16 samples.
For example if you sample at 16 kHz, you will get one bunch of equally spaced samples
every ms. This happens automatically and you get an interrupt when your samples are ready.
From there you can calculate one 14-bit sample.

Dora
Thank you very much for your reply.

Do you know how to program this type of µC? I've seen that there's an equivalent to the Arduino IDE called Energia, but it's only compatible with the modules integrating these µCs and not directly with the µC itself. Do we have to program via the registers?

And do we have to set up a hardware reset system when uploading code?
The advantage of the Teensy or other arduino-type boards is that downloading can be done very easily via USB or the RX/TX pins.
 
Hello!

Do you know how to program this type of µC?

Read my message above: "I have used many MSP430s."

I've seen that there's an equivalent to the Arduino IDE called Energia,

Forget it, it's a dead project.

Do we have to program via the registers?

Usually when you program anything, you access registers, yes. Or
are you asking if there are functions like digitalWrite? I guess you have
to make your own.

And do we have to set up a hardware reset system when uploading code?

Sorry, I don't understand this question.

The advantage of the Teensy or other arduino-type boards is that downloading
can be done very easily via USB or the RX/TX pins.

If I recall correctly, the 2619 doesn't have a USB interface by itself.
But as long as you provide a JTAG interface, you don't have to worry, the IDE
will do everything for you.
Now if you want to access the bootloader, you may want to use a FTDX chip on
port 1.1 and port 2.2.

Dora

 

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