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Help with WLAN 802.11g physical layer (OFDM) simulation using Simulink

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Chaitu86

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Hello everyone

I am currently studying the WLAN 802.11g physical layer (OFDM) in the Wireless Systems course at my technical school. I am very interested in conducting some simulations using Simulink to get a better understanding.

After I did some research about WLAN 802.11g and Simulink, I found that there is a WLAN 802.11a physical layer (OFDM) model in Simulink. The main difference between the 'a' and 'g' standard as I understood is the frequency at which they operate, 5 GHz and 2.4 GHz respectively.

My question is, is it possible to adapt the existing 802.11a model to the 802.11g considering their similarities? If so, can anyone help me in shortly explaining or hinting about what I need to change in the 'a' model.

Thanks :)
 

aquakeerthi

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802.11a
Frequency- 5 GHz
Typical Data Rate - 23 Mbit/s
Max Data rate – 54 Mbit/s
Range – 115 feet
802.11g
Frequency - 2.4 GHz
Typical Data Rate – 19 Mbit/s
Max Data rate - 54 Mbit/s
Range – 125 feet
but let me give ans asnswer for 802.11b to 802.11g
The 802.11b and 802.11g Wi-Fi networking standards are generally compatible. An 802.11b router / access point will work with 802.11g network adapters and vice versa.

However, a number of technical limitations affect mixed 802.11b and 802.11g networks:

* An 802.11b client will get no better network performance connected to an 802.11g router (access point), than it does when connected to an 802.11b router. Such a connection is limited by the speed of the 802.11b adapter.

* An 802.11g client will experience slower network performance connected to an 802.11b router than to an 802.11g router. Such a connection is limited by the speed of the 802.11b router.

* When both 802.11b and 802.11g clients are connected to an 802.11g router, the performance of the 802.11g clients can suffer. In the worst case, all 802.11g clients will slow down to have the same network speed as the 802.11b clients. More typically the 802.11g clients experience some degradation in performance, but they still perform noticeably faster than their 802.11b counterparts.

* The same encryption must be used on all devices on the Wi-Fi network. 802.11g devices often support more advanced encryption options than older 802.11b devices. For example, some 802.11g routers and network adapters support WPA, but many 802.11g products only support the weaker WEP. Stronger encryption options cannot be used on the 802.11g equipment if the 802.11b equipment does not support them.

In summary, 802.11b and 802.11g equipment can share a Wi-Fi LAN. If set up properly, the network will function correctly and perform at reasonable speeds. Mixing 802.11b and 802.11g gear can save money on equipment upgrades in the short term. An all-802.11g network provides the best wireless performance and is a worthy long term goal for home-owners to consider.
 

Chaitu86

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802.11a
Frequency- 5 GHz
Typical Data Rate - 23 Mbit/s
Max Data rate – 54 Mbit/s
Range – 115 feet
802.11g
Frequency - 2.4 GHz
Typical Data Rate – 19 Mbit/s
Max Data rate - 54 Mbit/s
Range – 125 feet
but let me give ans asnswer for 802.11b to 802.11g
The 802.11b and 802.11g Wi-Fi networking standards are generally compatible. An 802.11b router / access point will work with 802.11g network adapters and vice versa.

However, a number of technical limitations affect mixed 802.11b and 802.11g networks:

* An 802.11b client will get no better network performance connected to an 802.11g router (access point), than it does when connected to an 802.11b router. Such a connection is limited by the speed of the 802.11b adapter.

* An 802.11g client will experience slower network performance connected to an 802.11b router than to an 802.11g router. Such a connection is limited by the speed of the 802.11b router.

* When both 802.11b and 802.11g clients are connected to an 802.11g router, the performance of the 802.11g clients can suffer. In the worst case, all 802.11g clients will slow down to have the same network speed as the 802.11b clients. More typically the 802.11g clients experience some degradation in performance, but they still perform noticeably faster than their 802.11b counterparts.

* The same encryption must be used on all devices on the Wi-Fi network. 802.11g devices often support more advanced encryption options than older 802.11b devices. For example, some 802.11g routers and network adapters support WPA, but many 802.11g products only support the weaker WEP. Stronger encryption options cannot be used on the 802.11g equipment if the 802.11b equipment does not support them.

In summary, 802.11b and 802.11g equipment can share a Wi-Fi LAN. If set up properly, the network will function correctly and perform at reasonable speeds. Mixing 802.11b and 802.11g gear can save money on equipment upgrades in the short term. An all-802.11g network provides the best wireless performance and is a worthy long term goal for home-owners to consider.
Thanks for the information. I am already aware of the compatibility between 802.11b and 802.11g.
My question was different to what you answered.
 

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