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Help to find specs of this transformer

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FiFtHeLeMeNt

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Hi Guys :)
Can anyone help to identify the output voltage of this transformer ?
It belongs to an andis hair clipper charger. its input voltage is 110v which I connected it to 220v and it got burned. now I need to replace it.
As you can see in the picture its code is PI-66-101 12 12. I thought it may be some type of coding which someone knows about it.
I have tried to contact manufacturer for 1 month, but there has been no help :(
I would appreciate if someone can help me.
Regards
 

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Hi Guys :)
Can anyone help to identify the output voltage of this transformer ?
It belongs to an andis hair clipper charger. its input voltage is 110v which I connected it to 220v and it got burned. now I need to replace it.
As you can see in the picture its code is PI-66-101 12 12. I thought it may be some type of coding which someone knows about it.
I have tried to contact manufacturer for 1 month, but there has been no help :(
I would appreciate if someone can help me.
Regards
Hi
If you've burned it and it has a good thermal isolator , then you can trust to a simple way ! use an LCR meter and then measure the inductance of secondary and then use the main relation of a transformer .
it is one of the ways which can be used but that is not so precise and trustful !
So one of the other ways is seeing the circuit or system after this transformer and reading work voltages of the available elements .
The other way is , opening the twisted wires ! and counting number of turns ! then you can easily determine out put voltage .
Best Wishes
Goldsmith
 

Hi
If you've burned it and it has a good thermal isolator , then you can trust to a simple way ! use an LCR meter and then measure the inductance of secondary and then use the main relation of a transformer .
it is one of the ways which can be used but that is not so precise and trustful !
So one of the other ways is seeing the circuit or system after this transformer and reading work voltages of the available elements .
The other way is , opening the twisted wires ! and counting number of turns ! then you can easily determine out put voltage .
Best Wishes
Goldsmith
I am so surprised to see someone from Iran has answered me :D (Eradat darim)
Regarding first solution, I guess you are referring to this equation Vs/Vp=Ip/Is , I have Vp (110) and I can measure Is but I am missing Ip and I can not measure it trustfully as the primary circuit is burned. any ideas ?
I did some readings from circuit board, but I can not conclude based on that. it can be 6-12v.
and counting the wire turns ? LOL , is it really feasible ? from what I see from outside the primary of transformer is tens of thousands of turns :D
 

I am so surprised to see someone from Iran has answered me :D (Eradat darim)
Hi again
may i ask you why ? as it appears you're able to speak and write in farsi . are you a compatriot ? ( شما هم یک ایرانی هستید ؟)
Regarding first solution, I guess you are referring to this equation Vs/Vp=Ip/Is , I have Vp (110) and I can measure Is but I am missing Ip and I can not measure it trustfully as the primary
Did you read my former post exactly ? i've told measuring the inductance ! and in addition you can guess the current rating easily !
d=1.13sqrt(I/J) so j for such a low frequency and such a specification will be around 5 . so you can easily determine current rating according to the diagonal of wire !
I did some readings from circuit board, but I can not conclude based on that. it can be 6-12v.
and counting the wire turns ? LOL , is it really feasible ? from what I see from outside the primary of transformer is tens of thousands of turns :D
can you take a picture from the circuit after that and put it here please ? thus i think we're able to understand something more easier !
And about some thousands of turns , if you've to determine it and you don't want go through the mentioned ways you've to do it ! ( but i think the other mentioned ways would be well )
Good Luck
Goldsmith
 

Yes , I am an Iranian :)
I am sorry for my mistake for taking I for inductance. when you said main transformer equation and I saw the (I) in that equation I took it for inductance :D
Please bear with me, although I have got a bachelor in electronics engineering 10 years ago, I've not used it so far so I have forgotten a lot of things :) so consider me a noob.
I would appreciate if you write down the formulas which I should use so I dont go and take another formula and use that :D
Regarding d=1.13sqrt(I/J) , what is d exactly ?
Here are the pictures of the circuit and information regarding the charger itself :
https://www.dropbox.com/s/quhzb4wba68uu68/IMG_20130117_175421.jpg
https://www.dropbox.com/s/9vghfsiwd7f8cfe/IMG_20130117_175522.jpg

I hope you can figure out something from these pics.
Also as a fact I know the output voltage of the battery itself is 4.8v but I dont know why on the charger side it has 4 sockets.
 

Hi again



Yes , I am an Iranian :)
Nice to hear that ! ;-)


I am sorry for my mistake for taking I for inductance. when you said main transformer equation and I saw the (I) in that equation I took it for inductance :D
main transformer equation is as : N1/N2=V1/V2=I2/I1=sqrt(R1/R2)=sqrt(L1/L2)=sqrt(C1/C2)=E1/E2=..... etc ! didn't you ever hear about it ?
Regarding d=1.13sqrt(I/J) , what is d exactly ?
As i've mentioned before d is diagonal of wire !

Here are the pictures of the circuit and information regarding the charger itself :
Ok according to the circuit you can easily find the AC voltage of your transformer . it is enough that you just follow the path of integrated circuits and find their VCC value from their datasheet and then see their path if there is any regulator or any zener diode ! then guess it easily . or also looking into the capacitor after rectifier ! usually voltage of a capacitor should be 10 or 20 percent higher than maximum input voltage . i.e: VDC after rectifier and filter would be around VAC*sqrt(2) .
So you can easily find VAC with this method too !
Best Wishes + Good Luck (امیدوارم موفق باشی )
Goldsmith
 

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