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electronic simulator

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Akshaay

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Hi,
How the simulator simulates? I mean what are the algorithms or steps it does from schematic to the drawing the output waveforms at any node.What functionality is in there in the simulator.
Thanks in advance
 

KlausST

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Hi,

It´s just calculting voltage and current in very tiny time steps.

OK, this sounds too simple.

But you can do the same with Excel.
Test it with a single R or C.
Then test it with RC.
Then with RCR.
Then with RCRC.

Then add an ideal diode.
Then a diode with threshod voltage.
Then a diode with leakage resistor and series reistor...

Soon you will see: the more nodes the more difficult it becomes.

Klaus
 

Akshaay

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so, are there any algorithms which are used when the node becomes more?
Like If i want to make a simulator to for very simple circuits then i what i need to know?
Thanks Klaus for the information.
 

ThisIsNotSam

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so, are there any algorithms which are used when the node becomes more?
Like If i want to make a simulator to for very simple circuits then i what i need to know?
Thanks Klaus for the information.
there are researchers that spent a lifetime inventing the simulation methods used today in SPICE and other similar tools.
you can check this if you want: http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/pls/portallive/docs/1/7292571.PDF but I warn you that it is a rabbit hole...
 

BradtheRad

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Node voltage is determined by the net influence from neighboring branches. Each branch sends a certain volt level through a certain resistance, at a given instant.

Determine net influence by calculating the weighted contribution from all branches.

1) Take the reciprocal of each branch's resistance.

2) Add all results.

3) Take the reciprocal. The result is equivalent parallel resistance. (Similar to the approach with parallel wires.)

4) For each branch, divide its resistance into the equivalent parallel resistance. This yields a weighting percentage for that branch.

5) Multiply the weighting percentage times voltage coming from far end of branch. (Include capacitor charge levels, inductor emf, etc.)

6) Add all results. The sum is the voltage at the node.

7) Repeat for all nodes in the circuit.

8) With these new values for the circuit, make an new evaluation of time-dependent components (capacitors, inductors, etc.).

9) For complex circuits it may be necessary to perform further iterations, and to compare results until convergence is achieved.

10) Display the new frame.

11) Update power supply voltage. Repeat from Step 1.

- - - Updated - - -

The above is the algorithm I used to program my own home-brew circuit simulator. Being animated makes it useful as a tutorial. I turned many simulations into videos which I put on Youtube under my channel named 'patientbrad'.
 

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