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Effect of electric field on magnetic field

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nauma naseer

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i have a question that what will happen if we place electric field near to magnetic field
regards
 

SunnySkyguy

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An electric field has no effect on a magnetic field, but if generated with a source of current, then the source will have both. EF and MF
Why did you think fields interfere with each other? It is the circuits or cables that get interference conducting to circuits that get interference.

Are you are referring to some material effects?
 

PlanarMetamaterials

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An electric field has no effect on a magnetic field

\[{\nabla} {\times} \vec{H} = \vec{J} + \frac{{\partial} \vec{D}}{{\partial} t}\]


i have a question that what will happen if we place electric field near to magnetic field

The above equation is what happens in general. If you want a more specific answer, you need to give a more specific case.
 
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BradtheRad

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I'm trying to picture how the question might apply with real components... Perhaps, bringing a capacitor close to an inductor, such that each affects the other?

The replies (above) indicate something needs to be changing, as far as current flow. The effect of electrons rushing across a capacitor plate, etc.

So I'm picturing a very large capacitor. There is room between its plates for an inductor (or transformer)... And we send AC through one, or both... What sort of behavior would we observe? Reactive effects? Phase change?

Or how capacitor plates might be constructed around the windings, or how the windings might be wrapped around a capacitor plate, or placed adjacent to the plates... Would this create a new and useful component?

By any stretch of the imagination, could it become an easy and efficient means to change the step up or down ratio of a transformer?
Etc.
 

nauma naseer

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thank you for your reply
Actually i am considering the situation where a static point charge is placed near a bar magnet and i want to calculate energy flow in this situtation
 

PlanarMetamaterials

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thank you for your reply
Actually i am considering the situation where a static point charge is placed near a bar magnet and i want to calculate energy flow in this situtation

In this case, nothing is moving, such that there is no force exerted on either the bar or the charge. Therefore, no work is done, and power flow is zero.

Since the bar magnet produces no net magnetic field flux, one can envision a point charge embedded in a uniform magnetic field.

For every point outside of the point charge, there is a static electric field. At some point, this electric field will be orthogonal to the magnetic field. You may be tempted to then think that ExH has a nonzero real value. Specifically, it does, at that one point. However, on the exact other side of the charge, the electric field is oppositely directed, such that ExH here has the negative value of the first. Integrating around the charge, you can see that the net ExH (power flow) is zero.
 

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