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Can someone tell me about the current transients that the device can withstand

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In this device, VSC8531, I see the information about the transients that the device can handle on page 67, table 5.4.

It is for ESD/ lightning transients.

I just want to understand about the current transients that the device can handle? Like, how to infer the current transients from the values mentioned in the datasheet? Can someone help me to understand.
 

Refer to ESD standards, e.g. quoted Jedec standard to understand the relation between voltage and current. It's defined by the generator impedance, e.g. 150 ohm in IEC61000-4-2 air discharge.
 

Refer to ESD standards, e.g. quoted Jedec standard to understand the relation between voltage and current. It's defined by the generator impedance, e.g. 150 ohm in IEC61000-4-2 air discharge.
Does it relate to current transients? Could you explain it please
 

Refer to ohms law in case of doubt. Some EMI standards do also specify current waveforms for shorted generator, but IEC60001-4-2 doesn't.

Have to correct my previous statement, generator impedance is 330 ohm (in series with 150 pF) storage capacitor. Respectively 1000 V ESD pulse refers to 3A pulse current. Check Jedec standard generator spec.
 

The HBM ESD source model has plenty of documentation. Its energy is constrained. This is nothing like lightning, magnitude or duration.

That ESD footnote seems like it's trying not to say something. But take the 2000V bottom of Class 2, like it says. Divide by the (did you look it up?) 1500 ohms and there's your peak current. 1.33A.

But ESD protection is only as good as it needs to be and catastrophic failure at 2100V / 1.4A is perfectly acceptable to them. "Handling ESD" events are very brief duration but even so Joule energy in the current-loop devices is one wall of the design box. Don't bet on a whole lot of free margin for you to go stretching pulse width.
 

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