Welcome to EDAboard.com

Welcome to our site! EDAboard.com is an international Electronics Discussion Forum focused on EDA software, circuits, schematics, books, theory, papers, asic, pld, 8051, DSP, Network, RF, Analog Design, PCB, Service Manuals... and a whole lot more! To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

0201 resistors PCB population

Status
Not open for further replies.

Jester

Full Member level 6
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Messages
377
Helped
7
Reputation
14
Reaction score
7
Trophy points
1,298
Location
.
Activity points
4,754
I'm working on a design that must be VERY compact. To fit the required components on the board will require 0201 resistors.

I have been using 0402 components for quite a while and the local CM's I use in USA and Canada have no quality issues when populating 0402 components. I have yet to have any boards built with 0201 devices, and would like to hear about your manufacturing experiences when using 0201 devices. Any issues or full steam ahead?
 

ge

Full Member level 4
Joined
Jun 23, 2006
Messages
225
Helped
28
Reputation
56
Reaction score
27
Trophy points
1,308
Location
Pennsylvania, USA
Activity points
2,596
0201 ... pain in the butt. They float easily on solder paste. Assembly houses hate them.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jester

    Jester

    Points: 2
    Helpful Answer Positive Rating

ArticCynda

Advanced Member level 1
Joined
May 8, 2013
Messages
424
Helped
82
Reputation
164
Reaction score
81
Trophy points
1,308
Activity points
4,047
General rule of thumb for 0201 or smaller: don't use them. High end P&P machines are required to populate them, they easily short or tombstone during soldering, and because of their size it's nearly impossible to rework them.
ge said:
Assembly houses hate them.
That's an understatement. So expect price competitive assembly houses to refuse 0201, and expect very high assembly costs with those that do accept them.

If you're considering 0201 for the size, then keep in mind that the board space you save will be negligible while you're going to be all over your head in manufacturing problems. I no longer use parts smaller than 0603 (assembly houses favorite size) for large production runs, and so far haven't regretted the choice.

Summary tl;dr: don't do 0201 unless the cost of the final product isn't an issue.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jester

    Jester

    Points: 2
    Helpful Answer Positive Rating

Makalro

Newbie level 1
Joined
Jul 18, 2015
Messages
1
Helped
1
Reputation
2
Reaction score
1
Trophy points
3
Location
North Yorkshire, UK
Activity points
12
Hi. I just stumbled onto the site out of interest as I work for a contract electronics manufacturer. Reading this particular thread I'm not sure why it should be said that 'assembly houses hate' 0201 placement (?) It's not too cheap I grant you, and it depends on the particular assembly houses' standard of equipment and level of skill, but we successfully assembly a LOT of 0201's (alongside BGAs, micro BGAs, package on package etc) with very few issues.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jester

    Jester

    Points: 2
    Helpful Answer Positive Rating

marce

Advanced Member level 5
Joined
Feb 23, 2010
Messages
2,010
Helped
622
Reputation
1,244
Reaction score
606
Trophy points
1,393
Location
UNITED KINGDOM
Activity points
13,922
Had no problems with 0201's on very high density boards and 0402's are standard for decoupling on BGA boards. I would use an assembly house that can do them, many can...
The trouble with limiting to 0603's is they are no good for decoupling high density BGA's.
I have had many years of playing with SMD devices and reflow from the mid 80's and the only problems were not caused by the components sizes but by the assembly techniques be it incorrect solder paste deposition or incorrect reflow set up...
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jester

    Jester

    Points: 2
    Helpful Answer Positive Rating

SunnySkyguy

Advanced Member level 5
Joined
Sep 26, 2007
Messages
6,743
Helped
1,675
Reputation
3,348
Reaction score
1,644
Trophy points
1,413
Location
Richmond Hill, ON, Canada
Activity points
50,732
Lots of issues for orientation, shadow thermal effects of large parts, pad and track sizes and more.. Consult with IPC standards for design and DFM rules from Contract Mfg.

If you have a great design layout and good volume, then it is economical with the best sources. But if you ignore this , you may have much to learn.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jester

    Jester

    Points: 2
    Helpful Answer Positive Rating

marce

Advanced Member level 5
Joined
Feb 23, 2010
Messages
2,010
Helped
622
Reputation
1,244
Reaction score
606
Trophy points
1,393
Location
UNITED KINGDOM
Activity points
13,922
Designs regularly have chip components with one side connected to a solid copper pour, again in nearly 30 years with SMD only seen tombstoning a few times and again this was down to incorrect reflow, in these cases incorrect pre-heat causing a thermal shock almost as one end of the device heated up before the other, through a curtain of hot air... modern day equipment and assembly techniques have minimised all these problems. After all there are approx. 6 billion discrete components placed every day so plenty off feedback on assembly techniques.
My belief is if you are going to design PCBs then you should as part of your education learn about assembly techniques and the different ways of soldering available, also the importance of good stencil design...
Getting this lot of documentation is a good start, though the basic assembly and design specs (610, 6010-6013, 2221-2226) should be considered as required reading and reference.
https://portal.ipc.org/Purchase/ProductDetail.aspx?Product_code=4499ABA8-7C32-DD11-A3F8-001422202D38
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jester

    Jester

    Points: 2
    Helpful Answer Positive Rating
Status
Not open for further replies.

Part and Inventory Search

Welcome to EDABoard.com

Sponsor

Top