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  1. #1
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    eb/no c/n

    Hi all,

    I notice that most paper use Eb/No to describe performance. But product datasheet use C/N.
    Why use these two metric? And what's the relationship with them?

    Any suggestions will be appreciated!
    Best regards,
    Davy

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  2. #2
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    c/n eb/no

    Hi,

    I have found the following. Hopefully it should prove useful:

    C/N

    It is the Carrier to Noise Ratio. This is almost what you measure with the spectrumsanalyzer (The S.A. measures (C+N)/N but C+N is very close to C as N is very low compared to C).

    Eb/No is commonly used for digital carriers. Eb is the energy per information bit and No (N-Zero) is the noise in 1 Hz bandwidth.

    The relation between them are:

    C/N = (Eb/No)*DR/BWn , Where:

    DR= Datarate (inc. overhead, ex. coding bits)
    BWn = Noise bandwidth (= Occupied bandwidth * IF filterfactor (typical 1,2) )

    The C/N ratio is measured in a manner similar to the way the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) is measured, and both specifications give an indication of the quality of a communications channel. However, the S/N ratio specification is more meaningful in practical situations. The C/N ratio is commonly used in satellite communications systems to point or align the receiving dish; the best dish alignment is indicated by the maximum C/N ratio.

    Eb/No

    A common SNR-like figure of merit for digital communication systems, particularly those obeying Nyquist criteria. Also understood as SNR-per-bit, relates to BER for a given modulation type.

    Eb is independent of bit rate - it's the energy per bit sent, regardless of the rate.


    the following article should give a satisfactory explanation:

    http://www.sss-mag.com/ebn0.html


    1 members found this post helpful.

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  3. #3
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    eb/no vs c/n

    could any one post a clear figure of BER vs Eb/No



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    relation between eb/no and c/n

    Hello what is this IF filter factor, mebtioned earlier?



  5. #5
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    c/n eb/n0

    Quote Originally Posted by ekh_81
    could any one post a clear figure of BER vs Eb/No
    For which system do you mean? I beleive that the figure for BER vs Eb/No would differ from one system to another.



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  6. #6
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    eb n0 c/n

    ]

    Hello, dont be confuzed by Eb/N0 and C/N,
    Eb, related to energy per bit, and C related to carrier power, so you can consider any one for your simulation, also it is better to consider the ratio in dB,
    see the attached figure, maybe you need it, signal-to-noise ratio, SNR is also similar to Eb/N0 and C/N, .
    Best Regard
    Nidhal



  7. #7
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    C/N and Eb/No relation?

    can any one explain me that we measure both c/n and eb/no at the input to the receiver .



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