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Two toolchains in one computer?

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LBdgWgt

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Hi all,

I am doing a project of embedded linux. I am new with this thing.
I am confused about something. I use OpenSuse 10.1 on my Toshiba Laptop. It is already equiped with gcc v.4.10, binutils 2.16.91, and glibc-2.4

so i read some references about building this embedded linux system. They are using different Toolchains (different version of gcc, binutils, and some of them use uclibc instead of glibc as the C library)

so can i use 2 GNU toolchains in my laptop? i want to work first with the version written in the books. if it is possible, is there any reference? or someone can writ e the major steps?

big thanks for the help!
 

tien

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How does your build system (like make) identify your toolchain? In my case, I just add the path to my toolchain directory to PATH environment variable. So when I need to use another toolchain, I just change PATH.
 

dipal_z

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Yes you can have two different tool chains installed on your machine.

1. When you build the new toolchain use --prefix paramter of the configure script to install new toolchain in user defined folders instead of default folders.

2. Create a bash file or profile to set the environment variables like PATH, LIB_LD_PATH etc to point to alternate tool chain.

3. You can use which command to verify what toolchain is in path e.g. "which gcc".
 

LBdgWgt

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yes, finally i understand it. i used to crosstool from dan kegel, and it is a very nice tool indeed. it will make a new toolchain with "i686-unknown-gnu-linux-" prefix, so i dont have to change the PATH, but just add it.
 

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