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Samsung Infrared IR protocol

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fahad25

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My laziness comes up with a great idea for my next project. A remote control gadget to control my home appliances, with my existing SAMSUNG TV remote. I study through the net, with lots of "goggling". I think I should do this with AVR's ICP. But the problem after two days searching I cant find anything about samsung tv remote protocol. There are NEC, RC5 blah blah.... but only one place (i dont remember where:???:) it stated that they use there own protocol. I also get a link of elector magazine(april 2001) from this forum, It was a great help (thanx mate!:grin:). But It was a little bit short. Hope anyone can come with the solution. I just need to the whole protocol.

Regards,
Fahad
 

fahad25

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Thanx buddy! Great post. Just one complexity. It says it has 36KHz carrier whereas Elektor magazine says it is 38 KHz. Any idea how can I test?
 

hexreader

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Can't think of any way to test, other than hooking an oscilloscope up to the legs of the IR transmitter LED.
If you prefer not to open your remote, then I guess a scope across a IR detector (a straight 2 pin diode, not a 3 pin demodulator) might do the job, but you would be looking for very small signals.

My guess would be that 36KHz is correct. Maybe Google a few other sites and see what other sources suggest.

I use a 38KHz receiver for 36, 38 and 40KHz signals without noticable problems.
In theory I may be limiting the range by up to half by being 2KHz out, but it never seems to have mattered to me.
 

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