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Processing the signals generated by the sensor at the expense of sensitivity / selectivity

lufer17

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Hello, I'm having trouble finding study material or subject.

Theme: Emphasize the processing of signals generated by the sensor at the expense of sensitivity / selectivity.

I can find material related to sensors, but I couldn't find an explanation about 'processing the signals generated by the sensor at the expense of sensitivity / selectivity.'

Could someone explain or indicate a material (book)?
 

barry

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Pretty vague question. What kind of sensor, and what do you mean by “selectivity”? Are you talking the impact averaging, maybe?
 

lufer17

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Pretty vague question. What kind of sensor, and what do you mean by “selectivity”? Are you talking the impact averaging, maybe?
Really the subject is vague, because it is an example of a generic sensor that most sensors have this behavior.

I will explain what I have understood so far with research.

When we are talking about sensitivity, small changes (or changes) occur, give an electrical signal for example. this can be through graphs and using mathematical people with the relationship between the output and the input used graph using the derivative.

See, selectivity means to be selective in the type of signal you want to detect (read). example if I am using an ideal sensor (that is, it does not exist in the real world), it can separate two different quantities in its reading.

If we take an example, we have a temperature and gases to measure in the same place, if we have a sensor that is ideal, the sensor can read a single quantity, without interference from the other quantity. The real sensor (truth) can read, but with a small or large margin of reading error because of the other quantity.

My question: when we process the signals generated by the sensor at the expense of sensitivity / selectivity.
Precisely when we have processing the signals generated by the sensor to the detriment ... this does not achieve this relationship. (that understanding).
 

BradtheRad

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Sensitivity versus selectivity...

Brings to mind radio reception. Suppose you opt to enhance selectivity at one frequency. Then (in a sense) you're reducing sensitivity to other frequencies. And vice versa.
 

KlausST

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Hi,

Selectivity, sensitivity.

I think the correct terminology is: resolution, precision, noise, drift...this is how a sensor (signal) is specified.
Or did I misunderstand your description?

Klaus
 

danadakk

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A "typical" system consists of a sensor, with all its non linearities and
limitations, followed by a signal processing element, with all its non
linearities and limitations.

One "normally" tries to control the signal path such that the sensor errors
dominate. An example is using hiu resolution A/D, and or DSP to handle
filtering.

Broadly speaking.

Ref material normally is supplied by the sensor manufacturer for a typical;
application. Then one goes thru an analysis opf all errors to arrive at end
to end accuracy, resolution, drift, noise.......


Regards, Dana.
 

FvM

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As for the mentioned sensor selectivity, e.g. the selectivity of a gas sensor, it's not primarily related to sensitivity and can't be necessarily improved by signal procesing.

The situation is different for multispectral sensors, e.g. an absorption spectrometer that constitute their selectivity by signal processing. But as already mentioned by others, your question is too vague to read a specific question.
 

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