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Pic16f877a what is meant by f and a in controller name?

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imtisal

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Hello everyone,

What is meant by 'F' and 'A' in PIC16F877A,?

Thanks in advance,

Imtisal
 

F implies that it has flash memory.

A implies that it is an advanced/enhanced version. eg 16F877A has an analog comparator that the 16F877 doesn't have.

Hope this helps.
Tahmid.
 
O man, You made my day, :-D
Thank you, Bundle of thanks,

Imtisal,
 

A implies that it is an advanced/enhanced version. eg 16F877A has an analog comparator that the 16F877 doesn't have.

A implies that it is an advanced/enhanced version but it is functionally the same. The A type only comes as a 20Mhz version and it has a different (faster) programing algorithm. You cannot program the A type with the same program as the non A type and the other way around.
 
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PIC_microcontroller

Part number suffixes
The F in a name generally indicates the PICmicro uses flash memory and can be erased electronically. Conversely, a C generally means it can only be erased by exposing the die to ultraviolet light (which is only possible if a windowed package style is used). An exception to this rule is the PIC16C84 which uses EEPROM and is therefore electrically erasable.
An L in the name indicates the part will run at a lower voltage, often with frequency limits imposed.
Parts designed specifically for low voltage operation, within a strict range of 3 - 3.6 volts, are marked with a J in the part number. These parts are also uniquely I/O tolerant as they will accept up to 5 V as inputs.

Mainly, there were *many* errata with the original, the -A corrected some of them. The -A came in 20MHz variations as well. Do they even make 16F84s anymore?
**broken link removed**

https://www.edaboard.com/threads/252238/
https://www.edaboard.com/threads/107026/
https://www.edaboard.com/threads/107026/

Big difference, 877A is only available in market Do you get 877 easily in market? Improvements are to save their skin.
Both have been superseded by the new 16F887.
 

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