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On reverse engineering, flash memory extraction

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noiseqow

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Hi guys,

I'm doing some small reverse engineering experiments. For the past times, I always desoldered the parts I wanted to extract some info.

I've been using a Bus Pirate to accomplish this. Let's say, if I wanted to extract the contents of a SPI flash memory, do I really need to extract that component from the PCB before connecting the Bus Pirate (and the external power supply to that flash)?

It makes more sense to desolder the part imo, but I would like to know your POV, guys.

Thanks! ;- )
 

FvM

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You must somehow tristate the SPI master signals. If it's a processor or FPGA, holding it in reset would usually work. Or control the lines through JTAG boundary scan.
 

andre_luis

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I may be wrong, but does not this task related to intelectual rights violation ?

+++
 

FvM

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The procedure might be illegal, depending on the context and national law. It can be also understood as a simple in-circuit test method, used to check the integrity of your own products. European union law permits reverse engineering under specific conditions, by the way.
 

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