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New to micros, which one to chose?

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neazoi

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Hi,
I would like to do simple things using a small micro, but I do not know which one to chose.
For example, I would like to do a simple AGC for an oscillator, using the AD converter of a micro.
What is the easiest micro to go for?
And that includes the programming language and environment.
I would like it to be as simple as possible and the environment to be very lightweight, even running on win2k.
I am looking for a micro in that has at least an AD converter and a DA converter and small number of pins in DIP narrow package.
Am I asking too much?
 

ernpao

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I would recommend the arduino uno if you are looking for an mcu platform that is really simple to setup and use. The environment is lightweight imo (don't think you can run the ide on win2k though), can be programmed using c/c++. It has ad channels and you can use pwm for da conversion.
 
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milan.rajik

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You can use

PIC16F1704/5/7/8/9
PIC16F1784/86/87/88

They all have ADC and DAC. Some have 12 bit ADC.

If you can use ADC and PWM with a RC filter then go for 8 pin PIC12F1840.

My advice is upgrade your system so that it can run Win XP and install Free version of XC8 Compiler or try mikroC PRO PIC Compiler. If you can use mikroC PRO PIC Compiler then I can help you with the coding as it has ADC and PWM libraries.
 
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neazoi

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You can use

PIC16F1704/5/7/8/9
PIC16F1784/86/87/88

They all have ADC and DAC. Some have 12 bit ADC.

If you can use ADC and PWM with a RC filter then go for 8 pin PIC12F1840.

My advice is upgrade your system so that it can run Win XP and install Free version of XC8 Compiler or try mikroC PRO PIC Compiler. If you can use mikroC PRO PIC Compiler then I can help you with the coding as it has ADC and PWM libraries.

This is interesting.
I have some limited experience in the pic16f84 (ASM) before, so that should be more familiar to me. The PIC16F1788 seems the best in narrow dip package among them if I am not wrong.

Are the oldest versions of XC8 support all commands and libraries of the newer ones?
Where should i start from learning basic stuff in C for it?
 
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milan.rajik

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See if you can use MPASM on your PC. Also see if you can run demo version of mikroC PRO PIC Compiler for mikroElektronika. If you can install and use mikroC PRO PIC Compiler then try to use its ADC and PWMx libraries to make your project. If the code size is below 2 KB then it will compile in demo compiler.

Yes PIC16F1788 is the best device among the once I posted. There may be other PIC16Fs or 18Fs with ADC and DAC but the pin count of the device will be more.

You can use any 8 pin PIC with ADC and use a SPI DAC 16 bit if more resolution is needed. You can easily interface the SPI DAC say from LTC to 8 pin PIC12F and write Software SPI to communicate with the DAC. It will be very easy.
 
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horace1

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these days the minimum I would consider is 16bit microcontrollers

for example, Microchip's Microstick II development board
https://www.microchip.com/Developmenttools/ProductDetails.aspx?PartNO=DM330013-2

supports PIC24, dsPIC and PIC32 devices, has on onboard programmer/debugger and a header to plug it into one's own prototype boards
the MPLABX development environment is free
https://www.microchip.com/pagehandler/en-us/family/mplabx/

and there are lite versions of the XC16 and XC32 compilers which are free
https://www.microchip.com/pagehandler/en-us/devtools/mplabxc/home.html
 
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neazoi

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See if you can use MPASM on your PC. Also see if you can run demo version of mikroC PRO PIC Compiler for mikroElektronika. If you can install and use mikroC PRO PIC Compiler then try to use its ADC and PWMx libraries to make your project. If the code size is below 2 KB then it will compile in demo compiler.

Yes PIC16F1788 is the best device among the once I posted. There may be other PIC16Fs or 18Fs with ADC and DAC but the pin count of the device will be more.

You can use any 8 pin PIC with ADC and use a SPI DAC 16 bit if more resolution is needed. You can easily interface the SPI DAC say from LTC to 8 pin PIC12F and write Software SPI to communicate with the DAC. It will be very easy.

I was just hoping for a more lightweight environment, even portable. For example see this page I have written before https://qrp.gr/picprog/

- - - Updated - - -

these days the minimum I would consider is 16bit microcontrollers

for example, Microchip's Microstick II development board
https://www.microchip.com/Developmenttools/ProductDetails.aspx?PartNO=DM330013-2

supports PIC24, dsPIC and PIC32 devices, has on onboard programmer/debugger and a header to plug it into one's own prototype boards
the MPLABX development environment is free
https://www.microchip.com/pagehandler/en-us/family/mplabx/

and there are lite versions of the XC16 and XC32 compilers which are free
https://www.microchip.com/pagehandler/en-us/devtools/mplabxc/home.html


This is great but too much for me... my skills are bad!
 

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If you have experience with the 16F84 I would suggest the 16F1847 is the nearest 'modern' equivalent. It is pin and function compatible but uses the enhanced core and instruction set. It also has a built in oscillator so you can if you want, release the original two oscillator pins for other purposes.

It's very easy to use, I upgraded all my older 16F84 and 16F628 projects using them. If you want to take the plunge without 'upgrading' your Win2K, you can program all the PICs using a bootable Linux disc or as I do, a USB stick. MPLABX and the XC range of compilers is available for Linux and is free. I run them the whole OS, including the compilers on a USB stick so I can plug it into any computer as I travel around and not have to install anything to get working straight away.

Brian.
 
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This is great but too much for me... my skills are bad!
the great thing about the microstick II
https://www.microchip.com/Developmenttools/ProductDetails.aspx?PartNO=DM330013-2
is you can start with a simple program flashing the onboard LED and then extend the program to use UARTs, timers, etc

we use Microsticks for computing and engineering undergraduate and postgraduate projects - the boards are low cost so if they are damaged it is not critical and students can build their own circuits onto prototype daughter baords and then plug the microstick II into the header for testing

for more advanced projects one can use dev boards such as the explorer 16
https://www.microchip.com/Developme...4-15&utm_content=CPG&utm_campaign=Explorer+16

or for students who are looking at controlling a range of devices (motors, keypads, heaters, EEPROM, IrDA, etc) the Bytronic Mechatronics trainer
https://www.bytronic.net/html/pic24tb.html
 
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