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Low voltage, high current power supply

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stube40

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I need to design a power source capable of delivering high current (maybe 200 or 300A) at only 2V.

I thought I may be able to use TIs TPS40180EVM module - it has a lower current rating that I'm after, but you can stack them in a modular fashion.

However, I wondered if anyone had any better suggestions.

I'm more of a digital electronics guy, so designing from scratch is not a sensible move. Rather, something with a public domain reference design that I can just design into my own PCB would be ideal.
 

ejeet

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How long do you need the high current for? Large capacitors could be your solution.
 

stube40

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We're talking minutes here to begin with in (ie proof of concept). Long term it has to sustain it for hours at a time.
 

CEDeng

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You're describing, essentially, a welding-supply.

If you're not concerned with (physical) size, you can purchase a transformer that does what you describe. I've designed and built these supplies - I feed the transformer with a variac, either manually adjusted to desired current, or you can get more complicated and include a feedback and servo system for total control.
 

WimRFP

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If you need some efficiency you need the synchronous approach on the secondary side to eliminate the conduction loss of the rectifier. Looking to the power, I would go for a push-pull or full bridge approach (assuming mains input).
 

stube40

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You're describing, essentially, a welding-supply.

If you're not concerned with (physical) size, you can purchase a transformer that does what you describe. I've designed and built these supplies - I feed the transformer with a variac, either manually adjusted to desired current, or you can get more complicated and include a feedback and servo system for total control.

Very interesting, thanks. I think we have a variac here already. Could you suggest a transformer type or part to point me in the right direction? Also, any active/passive circuitry recommended on the output side of the transformer to keep things clean/safe? As you can tell, I'm still pretty much a total noob in the power electronics department.

---------- Post added at 22:57 ---------- Previous post was at 22:55 ----------

If you need some efficiency you need the synchronous approach on the secondary side to eliminate the conduction loss of the rectifier. Looking to the power, I would go for a push-pull or full bridge approach (assuming mains input).

Efficiency would be key for the production version, although I'm more concerned about functionality than efficiency in the prototype. Do you happen to know if there are there any circuits available online that demonstrate this type of solution? Many thanks, Stuart.
 

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