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How to Identify CentOS and Ubuntu Paritions?

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emaq

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I have a triple boot systems... Win 7, CentOS and Ubuntu.

It is is easy to distinguish the Windows NTFS partition but the CentOS and Ubuntu both have EXT4 file system.

How can I specifically identify the Ubuntu partition(s) including its swap partition?
 

betwixt

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Windows probably won't help you but if you open a terminal window in Linux try one of these:
lsblk -a -fs
sudo fdisk -l (lower case 'L')

You can also try graphically with 'Disks' or 'gparted' if they are installed in your distro.

Brian.
 

emaq

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Thanks Brian... of course Linux shows all the partitions.
If I use df -h on Ubuntu it shows the following 3 partitions which I assume are specifically Ubuntu partitions... correct if I am wrong.
/dev/sda5 /swap
/dev/sda8 /boot
/dev/sda9 /
 

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Almost certainly yes.
However, if you use the "lsblk -fs" instead it will also tell you which type of filing system is on the partitions. The letters "/dev/SDx" tell you which physical or OS device it is referring to.
This is a comparison of the commands on my system here:
Screenshot_20190911_084126.png
The entries show "sda1" is vfat because it is the UEFI boot partition,
"sda2" is formatted to Linux ext4 filing system
"sdb1" is a second drive, formatted to ntfs (it actually has Linux on it)
"sdc1" is a third drive holding legacy Windows although I never use it.
"sr0" is a Blu-Ray optical drive.

Brian.
 
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