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frequency effects on transformer

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musawenkhosi

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hi guys, i hope you can help. what would be the outcome of using a transformer designed for use at 200v 60hz, and operate it at 220v 50hz system.
 

Venkadesh_M

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more current and flux saturation in input and wave form distortion in output.... Emf equation is 4.44 f pi Z.. due to low frequency it will try to increase flux and current.... but the flux cant increase beyond core saturation..
 

fethiyeli

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The lower the operating frequency the more flux lines that are generated. Operating a transformer at 50Hz generates 20% more flux lines than at 60Hz. As the number of flux lines approaches the magnetic material’s limit, the heat in both the transformer’s core and its coil wires increases, and under certain circumstances, unpredictably so. This can result in a transformer that exceeds safe temperature levels. Therefore, a transformer designed to run at 50Hz will simply run cooler at 60Hz. But one designed only for 60Hz may overheat if subjected to 50Hz.
“In order to accommodate 50Hz operation, the transformer must employ a magnetic core material that can handle the added flux lines.

You can read here : https://www.edn.com/electronics-blo...sformer-Why-does-50Hz-make-such-a-difference-
 

musawenkhosi

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will that be the outcome even when the rated voltage is increased.....from 200v to 220v
 

schmitt trigger

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Operating a 200V, 60 Hz with 220V, 50 Hz you will penalize the flux density of the transformer twice:

a) By the increase in operating voltage from 200 to 220 V
b) and by the decrease of frequency from 60 to 50 Hz.

A 200 V, 60 Hz transformer can be operated from 50 Hz if you reduce the voltage 20%, or 160V, 50 Hz
 

musawenkhosi

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thanks guys for clarifying this concept..i suppose two areas in the transformer design has to to be explored and implemented;(1) the limits of the core material of the transformer as to how many flux lines it can generate, (2) the lower the frequency the high the flux is generated on the core, 20% more flux on 50 hz than 60 hz, and an increase on the primary current and impedance, which all results in overheating of the core and windings.
 

schmitt trigger

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To operate at a higher flux density, one should:
a) use a larger core stack area, or
b) use more turns.
Transformer designers usually make a combination of both.
 

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