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Floorplanning Guidelines for TSMC 7nm

aditya1579

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Hi All,

Can any one please let me know why in TSMC 7nm, all poly's are supposed to be in a straight line ?

Also what do different colored tracks and macro pins signify ? I have noticed that in my project there were yellow and red colored macro pins which had to sit below similar colored tracks....can someone please throw light on this ? Why is this required ?

Thanks,
Aditya
 

ThisIsNotSam

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poly is unidirectional for many years now, it is the only way to keep pushing the process technology further. not only it is unidirectional, it is also gridded. there is a very specific way to lay out poly in a regular fashion.

I think the colour issue you are referring to is simple metal coloring. it has been around for maybe 5 years or so? it has to do with process and how metals are deposited. it is a dual-tier process for the lower metals that are the hardest to print (say M3 and below). we say that you have M1C1 and M1C2, meaning metal 1 color 1 and metal 1 color 2. In innovus, it uses red and green contours to differentiate them. if you check the DRC rules, you will see things like M1C1-to-M1C1 distance and M1C2-to-M1C2 distance. they are not the same.
 

aditya1579

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Thank you very much for your reply. Can you please elaborate on why keeping poly unidirectional and aligned will help in pushing the process technology further ?

What is the meaning of gridded ?


poly is unidirectional for many years now, it is the only way to keep pushing the process technology further. not only it is unidirectional, it is also gridded. there is a very specific way to lay out poly in a regular fashion.

I think the colour issue you are referring to is simple metal coloring. it has been around for maybe 5 years or so? it has to do with process and how metals are deposited. it is a dual-tier process for the lower metals that are the hardest to print (say M3 and below). we say that you have M1C1 and M1C2, meaning metal 1 color 1 and metal 1 color 2. In innovus, it uses red and green contours to differentiate them. if you check the DRC rules, you will see things like M1C1-to-M1C1 distance and M1C2-to-M1C2 distance. they are not the same.
 

ThisIsNotSam

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gridded = in a grid, a pre-defined set of valid xy coordinates.
 

aditya1579

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Can you please elaborate on why keeping poly unidirectional and aligned will help in pushing the process technology further ?
 

ThisIsNotSam

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Can you please elaborate on why keeping poly unidirectional and aligned will help in pushing the process technology further ?
I am not a process engineer, so my explanation is really superficial. It has to do with how light is used to print the patterns and how it refracts and causes poorly printed shapes. If you keep it regular, these effects are easier to correct for. The whole machinery can be optimized for the single case where poly is unidirectional and regularly spaced.
 

timof

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It's much easier for lithography to print straight lines, versus arbitrary shapes.
You can print much thinner lines with smaller spacings, without creating shorts or opens.
 

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