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Electric vehilcle revolution can never happen....proof here....do you agree?

Z

zenerbjt

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This video proves beyond all doubt , that the electric vehicle revolution will never happen..because its simply not practical to make peoples residential households safe to charge the vehicles.
Due to grounding issues and the potential for a broken neutral in the supply.


Do you agree?
 
Z

zenerbjt

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Thanks, but as the video shows, the return path is either non existent in the event of broken neutral, or its too high impedance, because a low impedance earth connection is too expensive for most people.
 

ZASto

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If you have broken neutral, you have open circuit, so no charging at all.
Second, residential electrical grid is not capable of delivering extra power for chargers (except if chargers are not low power devices).

I had an idea of quick charging of batteries, with currents up-to 0.5C, but for traction batteries it draws significant current from the grid.

Another one: EV's are not so clean and green :) Electric power is generated in many countries from non renewable fuels (coal, gas, ...), so most CO2 is only shifted from exhaust pipes to a little bigger pipes :)
 
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KlausST

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Hi,

Initially I didn't want to contribute on the "loss of neutral" discussion....but now...
There must to be a proper intallation - there is no way about it. Else the major risk is heat and fire.
A connection does not fail "immediately" open.
I've seen several fails of 250A up to 6000A sytems (continous RMS), some 10kW up to 1MW.
The shifted potential problem surely was existing, but nobody cared about it, because the fire was the bigger problem.
The aim is not to detect "loss of neutral" the aim must be to prevent it.

*****

Current Tesla super charger can deliver up to 250kW. And they want to extend it to 1MW in near future.

Klaus
 
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dick_freebird

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Maybe home installations want their own
"battery wall" which could take a slow feed
all day and night and turn it into a fast-
charge resource for the garage, with a few
more safeties slathered on the requirements.

Internet videos are pretty poor at "proving"
anything generally, they are edited to
advance an argument, not deliver "proof"
by scientific standards (like for one, any
access to reviewable data and alternate
hypotheses).
 

c_mitra

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Who did the electrical installation?

If the neutral is broken, there will be no return path for the current. For a single phase circuit, nothing can work without a neutral. for a balanced three phase load, the presence or absence of the neutral does not matter.

I have no idea about the internal details of the chargers but if it has to deliver meaningful energy in a reasonable time period, the source should be more than 10kW and it shall ask for three phase supply.

My flat does not have three phase supply and if I have to install a EV charging station, I need to apply for another power connection that will be independent of my home connection. Three phase electrical connections at 440VAC comes with a distribution power transformer that is installed at the customer premises (sometimes they are also pole mounted but that depends). You usually draw the neutral from there.
 

RCinFLA

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EV chargers are isolated and senses faults. 'Earthing' is not the issue.

The issue is when a residential community all get home from work and simultaneously plug in their 20kW+ chargers it overloads the local grid causing a brown out. Some communities near San Jose, CA are already experiencing this issue.

There is discussion on chargers having remote control so the power companies can cut back useage to manage their peak demands. Pushing the demand to middle of night makes the utilities happy as they can get greater capital utilization.
 

c_mitra

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A very crude calculation:

Let us assume you plan to top up your EV with approx energy equivalent to 10L of petrol (gasoline).

10L of gasoline has approx 300 MJ of energy. You want to put this energy in the car over a period of 5 hrs (say).

1 kWh is equivalent to 3600000J or 3.6 MJ of energy. So the charging process will cost you more than 80 Units (1 Unit =1 kWh)

Considerable power in my opinion.
 

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