Welcome to EDAboard.com

Welcome to our site! EDAboard.com is an international Electronic Discussion Forum focused on EDA software, circuits, schematics, books, theory, papers, asic, pld, 8051, DSP, Network, RF, Analog Design, PCB, Service Manuals... and a whole lot more! To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Register Log in

Does using a push only plug for and F connector in a coaxial cable decreases the signal or adds noise?

SparkyChem

Member level 2
Joined
Apr 22, 2010
Messages
50
Helped
0
Reputation
0
Reaction score
0
Trophy points
1,286
Location
Lima, Peru
Activity points
1,928
Howdy!. I'm intending to find a replacement cable for my cablemodem unit. The existing cable that the phone company installed is a screw in terminal on both ends of the coaxial cable with one end connected to the modem and the other connected to a splitter.

What I intend to do is to replace the cable with another one which has a non screw F terminal, something which can be plugged by only pressing it against the female terminal either the modem or the splitter.

Upon browsing online I found these and also this.

The reason for why I intend to use these instead of the regular screw in type F connector is because my cablemodem is in a temporary place (as I have recently moved) and I have to disconnect it from time to time to take the unit to other part of the house.

And I noticed after unplugging it a couple of times the screw indents on the edges of the female and male terminals seem to be wearing off. In order to avoid further worsening the situation (other than obviously finding for them a more permanent place, which I cannot do for the time being) I considered to use these friendly pushing in alternatives for a type F connector.

However, neither of these indicate if the signal will be affected by using this?. Will it make any noticeable difference?. Back in the 90s my tv cable provider installed the cable to a wall in my house and I noticed the socket in the wall had much noise, so when I replaced the F terminal and connected it directly to the tv it improved a lot the quality of the image, hence my question.

I do not have an oscilloscope neither any other sophisticated equipment to verify this. But does it exist any reason to believe such?

Has anyone used these cables?. I remember using them on my VCR equipment back in the 90s as well and I had good experience using these push only F terminals, never had any sort of diminishing the quality. But since I intend to use these for a cablemodem which transfers data, will that make any difference?. If I buy the cable on amazon which I had referenced earlier will it be a safe choice?. Does the influx of information on a coaxial cable will it make it get hot or something? Does it exist better alternatives along the options which I have mentioned above?.

AS mentioned I also found this but I have no idea if it will be safe, does it exist some specification or some group of cables which say specifically only for tv use or not for internet use. Does it exist some standard for this? Can someone guide me with this matter?. So far I do remember that RG59 coax cable has a higher impedance than RG6 and typically lower impedance cables are used for data while higher are used on tv or video signals, but would it mean that in terms of power dissipation, one may heat more or something like that?.
 

dick_freebird

Advanced Member level 5
Joined
Mar 4, 2008
Messages
7,129
Helped
2,088
Reputation
4,180
Reaction score
1,934
Trophy points
1,393
Location
USA
Activity points
57,198
Every single piece of hardware adds to insertion
loss and distortion. But how much, is the question
and you can only know by testing with good
instruments.

Quick-connects are not well regarded in RF test
because they do not deliver consistency against
jostling, vibration, across teardown and setup, etc.
Test methods tend to require a well controlled
mating torque on screw connectors to ensure
signal path repeatability.

Cables have loss and some more than others, and
the cable company has its preference which, if you
go another way, they will blame all your problems
on. That is not necessarily about facts, but rather
the apportionment / avoidance of blame and effort.
 

FvM

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 22, 2008
Messages
47,960
Helped
14,147
Reputation
28,553
Reaction score
12,833
Trophy points
1,393
Location
Bochum, Germany
Activity points
278,233
I see no reason why the "push-on" F connectors, that are commonly shipped with cable modems these days shouldn't provide the same quality as classical screw connectors. I would even expect less connector wear with frequent re-plugging.
 

JohnBG

Junior Member level 3
Joined
Feb 23, 2021
Messages
27
Helped
3
Reputation
6
Reaction score
2
Trophy points
3
Activity points
238
Your internet provider devised the system with screw connector because:

1 Screw connectors introduce less noise than flat ones

2 The unknown brand/model of the ‘modem’ seems to be purposed as stationary, no mobile.

3. The tear and wear is a logic occurrence after a few cycles of plug/unplug but it was not conceived as the way to use such device.

4. If the modem accidentally falls off or suffers damage because of the frequent shifting, you may have to pay for a new one, if attempting replacement but the provider decides to consider obvious signs of mishandling.

For the above points, it is probable that you are going to experience a degradation of the service, if not temporary disruption, (because the connectors will break, excessive cable cankering, bending (this may require for you to visit a store for replacement), perhaps permanent (if you call the internet provider inquiring for blocky pictures and poor BER and they find out that you decided to replace the connector type, rendering the contract between you and your internet provider void).

May I suggest that if the reason for moving the modem often is low wifi, then improve indoor wifi coverage and leave the modem in the place where the installer left it?

If the frequent movements of the modem are security related, then again it may be worth increasing security before shifting your device any further.

Another option is to install a socket in the 2nd location and wire the output, if not too far, so 1 modem feeds 2 points.
 

Part and Inventory Search

Welcome to EDABoard.com

Sponsor

Top