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coefficient of coupling

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aersoy

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There may be no real material whose coefficien of coupling is 0 is practice.
What I want to know is for which kind of materials it approaches 0.
0≤k≤1 ==> coefficient of coupling
magnetic nonmagnetic etc.
I am still looking for it.
If i can find it i will post it.
 

The Joy of Electronics

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Hey... coefficient of coupling is not related to the material used as core. It is related to how, in a sense, windigs are close together, so that their mutual flux passes throhgh both. Distant windings with uncommon cores are good a good example of this situation.
 

    aersoy

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sonal

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The COEFFICIENT OF COUPLING of a transformer is dependent on the portion of the total flux lines that cuts both primary and secondary windings.

Ideally, all the flux lines generated by the primary should cut the secondary, and all the lines of the flux generated by the secondary should cut the primary.

The coefficient of coupling would then be one (unity), and maximum energy would be transferred from the primary to the secondary. Practical power transformers use high-permeability silicon steel cores and close spacing between the windings to provide a high coefficient of coupling.

Lines of flux generated by one winding which do not link with the other winding are called LEAKAGE FLUX. Since leakage flux generated by the primary does not cut the secondary, it cannot induce a voltage into the secondary.

The voltage induced into the secondary is therefore less than it would be if the leakage flux did not exist. Since the effect of leakage flux is to lower the voltage induced into the secondary, the effect can be duplicated by assuming an inductor to be connected in series with the primary. This series

LEAKAGE INDUCTANCE is assumed to drop part of the applied voltage, leaving less voltage across the primary.
 
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    aersoy

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