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  1. #1
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    Hatched vs Solid pour

    When should I choose to use a hatched vs a solid pour?

    Thanks,

    Zack

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  2. #2
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    Re: Hatched vs Solid pour

    In the case of the low speed boards you can use both of them. Actually, the Hatched pour is used in an analog and low current parts of board. In the HS board the Solid pour is used. It is so because at low speed the current choose the way with low RESISTANCE and at HS - with low INDUCTANCE (scin-effect), and brakes in the plane are not good for HS.

    Best Regards!



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    Re: Hatched vs Solid pour

    Thanks avesat. I also found a reference which gives all the physics behind why to use solid pours for high frequency boards, and the contrast against hatched. Cool!

    http://www.emchome.net/article.php/3095



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    Re: Hatched vs Solid pour

    Be careful with this terminology.

    A hatched polygon or pour can also be the same as an electrically solid one depending on which package you use.

    Hatched polygons can have a track fill width of say 0.2mm but have a distance of 0.1mm so will act as a solid.

    Some packages allow for copper pours or solid regions, but in this case the only things drawn on the screen are the polygon outline and thermals and no copper actually exists until output.

    These approaches can have an effect of increased user performance.

    :F



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    Re: Hatched vs Solid pour

    sometime salso we need to care about plotter on PCB FAB, some can not plot solid region, so thy the suggestion is to plase hatched lines very closely to fill area,

    BUT, for AD6.7 users: you will have problem in this case, the tool became very slow and also will give you bug message or internall error message in each 10 minutes!



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  6. #6
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    Hatched vs Solid pour

    There are also the board fab houses to consider.

    AFAIK they prefer hatched if possible, if the board also includes lots of thin tracks as it helps even up the etching and reduces the number of boards that fail (get etched away tracks).
    Please do not PM me questions that are better asked in the PCB forum :)



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