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  1. #21
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    Re: How can I generate Sine wave from any periodic waveform that has low frequency?

    Quote Originally Posted by FvM View Post
    Not lower than imposed by the Nyquist criterion. In practice at least 25 to 30 kHz, higher if you want to keep the filter effort low.
    If I want a 10kHz sine wave, by Nyquist criteria, 25kHz to 30kHz should be my filter's cut-off frequency, right? It is not carrier frequency. I think Carrier frequency should be much higher, but I don't know how to choose the carrier frequency.



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    Re: How can I generate Sine wave from any periodic waveform that has low frequency?

    Quote Originally Posted by wwfeldman View Post
    you specified a sin wav up tp 10 kHz, with THD < 5%

    where does carrier frequency come in?
    carrier frequency implies some sort of modulation.
    is there any expected modulation?
    The carrier frequency could come from Class D amplifier or Class C amplifier, and the power amplifier's gate driver signal comes from FPGA.



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  3. #23
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    Re: How can I generate Sine wave from any periodic waveform that has low frequency?

    carrier frequency implies some sort of modulation.
    Right. PWM can do, as said. See e.g. post #12.

    - - - Updated - - -

    If I want a 10kHz sine wave, by Nyquist criteria, 25kHz to 30kHz should be my filter's cut-off frequency, right? It is not carrier frequency.
    It is in the first order. Nyquist criterion defines the ratio of signal to carrier frequency. The filter transition band however has to fit in-between.

    That's easily achieved in the digital domain with audio filters. But an analog output filter for a class-D amplifier suggests larger ratios.

    As I don't apply to design the application for you (I guess neither other Edaboard members), I suggest that you start to do calculations on your own.

    the power amplifier's gate driver signal comes from FPGA.
    Fine, this gives you the option to choose frequencies independent of controller restrictions, just according to power stage and filter properties. The initial request for using "lower switching frequency" doesn't seem substantiated under this prerequisite.



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    Re: How can I generate Sine wave from any periodic waveform that has low frequency?

    Quote Originally Posted by c_mitra View Post
    I do not know what is the objective of the said exercise, but you can always use a bandpass filter to get a sine wave from any arbitrary waveform.

    Of course if you want to have a variable centre frequency, you have to do more work.

    By the way, a square wave of frequency f (say 10kHz) will have sine wave components of f, 2f, 3f etc (but no sub-harmonics).

    So if you want to have pure sine wave, you have to use a high order band pass filter. But using a digital filter may be simpler in many cases.
    I think a square wave of frequency f (say 10kHz) will have sine wave components of f, 3f, 5f, 7f....Odd harmonics!



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    Re: How can I generate Sine wave from any periodic waveform that has low frequency?

    Quote Originally Posted by Audioguru View Post
    I have used a Switched Capacitor Butterworth Lowpass Filter IC to produce an audio sinewave with extremely low distortion (almost no harmonics)
    Hi,

    Can you please share some reference about what you have done (Switched Capacitor Butterworth Lowpass Filter IC)? BTW, what is your input signal?



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    Re: How can I generate Sine wave from any periodic waveform that has low frequency?

    Hi,

    http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Switched+Capacitor+%20Filter+IC

    even on the first page I see a couple datsheets of devices from different manufacturers and documents explaining the function....
    What else do you need?

    Klaus
    Please don´t contact me via PM, because there is no time to respond to them. No friend requests. Thank you.



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    Re: How can I generate Sine wave from any periodic waveform that has low frequency?

    The switched capacitor filter IC I used a long time ago is obsolete now and not made anymore. Maxim have some today.



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    Re: How can I generate Sine wave from any periodic waveform that has low frequency?

    Here is more specific requirements. Instead of arbitrary waveform output, I need only Sine wave.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Re: How can I generate Sine wave from any periodic waveform that has low frequency?

    Filtering a square wave with a switched capacitor or other low power filter implies that you have an analog power amplifier to generate the specified output. In this case, it would be much easier to use an oversampling audio DAC as signal generator.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Doesn't change much for the hardware requirements. You want sine of arbitrary frequency, DAC is an universal hardware solution.



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    Re: How can I generate Sine wave from any periodic waveform that has low frequency?

    I think a square wave of frequency f (say 10kHz) will have sine wave components of f, 3f, 5f, 7f....Odd harmonics!
    right, but...

    A square wave of 50% duty cycle has some symmetry and because of that even components (even harmonics) disappear.

    But if you have a pulse sequence that have 40% (something not equal to 1/2) duty cycle, the symmetry disappears. Then you will have all the frequencies.

    A small deviation from the 50% symmetry can cause these even harmonics to appear.



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    Re: How can I generate Sine wave from any periodic waveform that has low frequency?

    Quote Originally Posted by c_mitra View Post
    right, but...

    A square wave of 50% duty cycle has some symmetry and because of that even components (even harmonics) disappear.

    But if you have a pulse sequence that have 40% (something not equal to 1/2) duty cycle, the symmetry disappears. Then you will have all the frequencies.

    A small deviation from the 50% symmetry can cause these even harmonics to appear.
    You are right! 50% duty cycle square wave has odd harmonics, but other than 50% has all the frequencies. Thanks for correcting!



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    Re: How can I generate Sine wave from any periodic waveform that has low frequency?

    By definition a square wave has 50% duty cycle. Any other duty cycle wave would be called Pulse wave or rectangular wave.

    Just saying.


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    Re: How can I generate Sine wave from any periodic waveform that has low frequency?

    you might consider a peaking butterworth low pass filter
    Sallen Key style
    set Q about 8 or 10, let R1 = R2 and C1 = C2,
    one op-amp, 2 resistors, 2 capacitors and bypass capacitors

    net result is your 10 kHz signal since the 10 kHz square wave input has no lower frequency components



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    Re: How can I generate Sine wave from any periodic waveform that has low frequency?

    Second order Butterworth has Q=0.71 and monotonous magnitude response by definition. Q=8 corresponds to Chebyshev with about 18 dB ripple.

    In any case the solution is far from the original requested 0 - 10 kHz frequency range, but may be it's not so serious.



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