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  1. #1
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    How to build a thermo-conductive resistor? Or whatever this thing is called....

    Basically what I'm looking to do is make a 2"x4"x1" metal brick that gets hot up to about 300-400 degrees Fahrenheit, and plug it into an American wall outlet. It would be nice if I could control the heat with more than an on/off switch or by pulling the plug. As you can probably tell I'm a complete novice in this and I barely know what to call this sort of device. The closest thing I've found in my google searches is a metal 'hot cutting knife' for bee keepers to cut wax off in slabs.

    I would like to be able to mount this device to a table, woodworking wise I am more than knowledgeable and that wouldn't be an issue. Its the Watts, volts, amperes and ohms I'm uncertain about. I apologize if this is in the wrong thread and take no offence if a moderator deletes this or moves it elsewhere.

    Much appreciated, ExTemp.

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  2. #2
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    Re: How to build a thermo-conductive resistor? Or whatever this thing is called....

    An easy method is to use a thermostat from a portable space heater. You might need to position it a certain distance from your heated brick, so it responds at its temperature range.

    Or install a relay, controlled by an old-fashioned room thermostat. Position the thermostat a foot or two above your heated brick. Assuming the air is calm, air rising from the brick can assume a normal temperature range for the thermostat to turn on and off.

    If you search you might find another temperature sensor, such as automotive types, radiator temperature, etc.


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  3. #3
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    Re: How to build a thermo-conductive resistor? Or whatever this thing is called....

    If you think the described device is made as a retail product, you should describe it's usual application, tell where you have seen it, send a photo etc.

    I would name it a heater block, similar devices are e.g. used in analytical instruments. The block can be made of aluminium, brass, possibly copper. It has one or more bores for heater cartridges and one smaller bore for a temperature sensor. The heater power depends on the required maximum temperature, heating rate, power absorbed by application (e.g. the medium to be heated up). An electrical temperature controller will be used in most cases, in some cases a mechanical thermostat will be sufficient.

    By the way, apart from the demanded square shape, a flat iron might do the job.

    - - - Updated - - -

    P.S.: A manufacturer of heater cartridges https://www.omega.com/prodinfo/CartridgeHeaters.html


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  4. #4
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    Re: How to build a thermo-conductive resistor? Or whatever this thing is called....

    Previously this was the closest thing I could find commercially I've thought about converting an old stove-top range heating element and putting underneath the heater block, but it was too cumbersome and I wanted to limit the danger excessive heat. Both posts help me immensely in narrowing my search and the cartridge heater looks like it could be the easiest way to heat the metal . The air would have to be moving since the material being heated gives off fumes requiring a fume hood or fan to keep my fabricators safe. The material I'm heating is Santoprene, its used to make gaskets for industrial kitchens and restaurants.

    The closest 'name' for this device is a vulcanizer, however searches for that only bring up large equipment for vulcanizing rubber. I just need a small aluminum brick to be heated up enough to melt two pieces of santoprene and fuse them together.

    I'll look into a flat iron and see if I can use it, or at the least pull it apart and modify it for my purposes. The heater cartridge looks like my best option here.

    Thank you guys both for being so helpful!

    ExTemp.



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