+ Post New Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Newbie level 5
    Points: 310, Level: 3

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    9
    Helped
    0 / 0
    Points
    310
    Level
    3

    Filter Design for broad band

    Here, classical filter design method i know but i am not sure about filter design for following situation.

    picture is given below for detail where 50 ohm is matched to capacitor and resistance load of 20 ohm, for band of 6 GHZ with center frequency of 5.5 GHz.

    •   AltAdvertisement

        
       

  2. #2
    Super Moderator
    Points: 52,942, Level: 56

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
    Posts
    12,949
    Helped
    2580 / 2580
    Points
    52,942
    Level
    56

    Re: Filter Design for broad band

    You can create a bandpass filter by putting in a series inductor. Or as an alternate there is a 2-capacitor bandpass. Perhaps it's not giving away too much if I post these...



    These are merely two easy methods. By playing with values you might obtain the specified rolloff curve. Even then there could be a better method.


    1 members found this post helpful.

    •   AltAdvertisement

        
       

  3. #3
    Super Moderator
    Points: 260,253, Level: 100
    Awards:
    1st Helpful Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Bochum, Germany
    Posts
    45,450
    Helped
    13829 / 13829
    Points
    260,253
    Level
    100

    Re: Filter Design for broad band

    Wideband matching of a reactive load isn't generally possible. I don't see a way to achieve it in the present case.


    1 members found this post helpful.

    •   AltAdvertisement

        
       

  4. #4
    Junior Member level 2
    Points: 161, Level: 2

    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    21
    Helped
    4 / 4
    Points
    161
    Level
    2

    Re: Filter Design for broad band

    Hello @rajesh navagare ,

    For a properly filter design I think you would need 50 ohms in both ports.

    Maybe a matching network is what you need.

    I often use this calculator to simplify work:

    https://www.eeweb.com/toolbox/t-match

    You will need to know that 0.7pF are Z_c=1/jwC where w=2pif

    BR



--[[ ]]--