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    delta connect load voltage at open side

    http://obrazki.elektroda.pl/8179396100_1460918152.jpg

    in the above circuit digram of delta load what is the voltage present on open end side with respect to netral



    regards
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  2. #2
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    Re: delta connect load voltage at open side

    We assume R-Phase and Y-Phase are measured relative to the Neutral ground icon.
    The influence of the resistor network is symmetrical.
    Therefore V is always the average of R-Phase and Y-Phase.
    Perhaps the answer requires more thought than the above, so don't take my reply as the only answer.



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  3. #3
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    Re: delta connect load voltage at open side

    Well the attached ltspice simulation shows that its 116VRMS.



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  4. #4
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    Re: delta connect load voltage at open side

    R1 does not figure in this problem. So using the red phase as a reference, add to it another 230V @120 degrees. answer as above. More accurate answer is 415/3^-2 instead of 230V.
    Frank



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