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  1. #1
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    poured ground plane

    hi,

    recently i'm doing a PCB board and at the moment I need to know more on copper pour & ground plane.

    Are they linked together?
    What's the different btw them?

    Thanks.

    Cheer.

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  2. #2
    Newbie level 4
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    copper pour on bottom layer

    NO they not the same.
    Copper pour is like polygon, and it is on top or bottom layer,
    plane is a inside layer of pcb
    in exaple in 4 layer pcb you've got top and bottom layer where you makes copper pours, and two inner layer for GND and VCC. On this inner layers you can place a planes of GND and EARTH, or 5V and 3,3V and many more.



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  3. #3
    Advanced Member level 4
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    copper pour vcc and gnd

    A PCB plane is just what the name suggests, it is a layer of continuous copper. Planes can be internal layers, or the top and bottom layers of a PCB can be planes. Planes can be cut into sections called "split planes" by drawing void lines on the plane with the PCB editor. When the board is made, the void areas are etched away leaving the plane sections isolated from one another. Split planes are used to allow differenct nets to share the same copper plane layer without connecting to one another.

    A pour is done in a specific area of a PCB layer. It can be any size or shape, it can be done on any signal layer, and it can be connected to any net you desire. Pours are generally done to create a locally shielded region of the board. They are also used to create special inductance and/or capacitance conditions in a region of the board. They are called pours because PCB edtiors treat them like pouring a liquid in a region of the board design - you set a boundary with the editor, then the editor fills the boundary area with copper. Rules can be set to cause the pour to avoid (flow around) traces or other board features by a certain distance, other rules can be set that cause pads or vias to connect to the pour with either thermal connections or solid connections.

    There is no physical difference between the copper in a pour region and the copper on a board plane. The only difference is in the way they are created by the PCB editor you may be using.


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