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    555 timer duty cycle

    I need an oscillator to generate a clock for a project I'm building. From what I've read from data sheets, it seems like I cannot get 50% duty cycle with a 555 timer configured in astable mode. Any suggestions as to alternative ICs?

    FYI, I'm looking to generate a 2MHz clock for a logic circuit.

    •   Alt29th December 2006, 16:03

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    555 duty cycle

    It is very difficult to get perfect symmetry with a 555 but you can get near 1% difference. You need to get the ratio of your timing resistors as high as possible. You will be limited by the minimum resistance (Rt) values for the 555



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    555 timer 50% duty cycle

    Quote Originally Posted by E-design
    It is very difficult to get perfect symmetry with a 555 but you can get near 1% difference. You need to get the ratio of your timing resistors as high as possible. You will be limited by the minimum resistance values for the 555
    I neglected to mention this in my original post: I'm trying to make my project work for several different Vcc values (for 2V, 3V, and 5V). So according to you, I should be a little concerned with the resistor limitations. According to what I've read for the Motorola MC1455, I'm limited to a resistor value:

    RA = Vcc/0.2

    Since duty cycle = RB / (RA + 2 * RB), this means that my RB value is also going to be limited to Vcc as well, and RB would also change with Vcc changes.

    Are there any alternative IC packages I can use to the 555 timer? Or any circuit topology I can build myself?



    •   Alt29th December 2006, 17:32

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    555 timer 50 duty cycle

    2MHz is not practical for the 555. You better off to use a few gates and a 2MHz crystal to do the job. If you need 50% duty cycle you can do 4MHz and put it through a flip-flop

    Diagram shows a typical circuit. U2 provides 50% duty cycle at 2MHz. You may want to make R2 variable to determine the correct value experimentally.


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    50% duty cycle oscillator

    Thank you for the quick reply.

    Just curious: what if I'm doing like an ASIC design vs. breadboard prototyping like I'm doing? I'm assuming ASIC designers do not necessarily use crystal oscillators? I've learned ring oscillator topologies, but from some simulation work I've done in classes we've learned that their frequencies vary too much with changes in Vdd. What other topologies are there?



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    555 50 duty cycle

    E-design is right when using 4013 as this flip-flop will give you the perfect 50% duty cycle pulses, and avoiding using 555 as it can work for frequency up to 2 or 3 hundred thousand hertz only.

    However, for the oscillator, to choose CMOS for working with crystal, the best device is 4069UB. In principle, any NAND or NOR can be used, but only 4069 will not make you troubled in any case. Consult 4069 datasheet for oscillation circuits.

    nguyennam


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    555 duty cicle

    Hi,

    I would like to draw your attention to the CMOS version of the 555 circuit, the LMC555 from National Semi. or TLC555 from Texas Inst. and the astable mode working frequency is claimed to be 2MHz typically at Vcc of 5V. Its data sheet includes a diagram for 50% duty cycle operation too. See this link that includes it:
    http://www.williamson-labs.com/480_555.htm and look for DATA SHEETS around the middle of the page.

    It works from 1.5V supply voltage too. So it would be worth trying I suppose. I know the MC1455 is ALSO a CMOS version of this timer family but its claimed upper frequency limit is defined as higher than 500kHz and its recommended lower supply limit is 5V.

    The only drawback of the LMC/TLC555 could be a possible frequency instability at 2MHz due to temperature, if this is important, than you may use this interesting variable duty cycle circuit with the diodes for temperature compensation:
    http://www.elecdesign.com/Articles/P...ArticleID=6235
    Due to the diodes forward drop voltage this solution may need at least 3-3.5V supply voltage or a bit higher, a test/experiment is needed.

    rgds,
    unkarc


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