---
+ Post New Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24
  1. #1
    Member level 3
    Points: 1,660, Level: 9

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    india
    Posts
    56
    Helped
    5 / 5
    Points
    1,660
    Level
    9

    220v rms

    sorry for this silly question .but i can't find the answer anywhere..

    •   Alt16th December 2005, 09:27

      advertising

        
       

  2. #2
    Advanced Member level 5
    Points: 160,151, Level: 95
    Awards:
    Downloads2nd Helpful Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    7,943
    Helped
    2302 / 2302
    Points
    160,151
    Level
    95

    220 v rms

    It is RMS ..
    If you would like to read more on this issue, here is a link:
    http://www.eng.uct.ac.za/~victor/electric/ACDC.htm
    Regards,
    IanP



  3. #3
    Member level 2
    Points: 1,507, Level: 8

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    44
    Helped
    2 / 2
    Points
    1,507
    Level
    8

    220v rms?

    It is in RMS... same as 110V in power lines



  4. #4
    Full Member level 4
    Points: 2,225, Level: 10

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Chennai, India
    Posts
    188
    Helped
    20 / 20
    Points
    2,225
    Level
    10

    110v vrms

    its RMS


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Advanced Member level 2
    Points: 5,970, Level: 18

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Tamilnadu
    Posts
    657
    Helped
    36 / 36
    Points
    5,970
    Level
    18

    relation between rms and peak

    moreover .why it should be RMS ....why should not as +340V,-340V while referring



  6. #6
    Member level 3
    Points: 3,616, Level: 14

    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    67
    Helped
    20 / 20
    Points
    3,616
    Level
    14

    relation between rms and peak voltage

    Quote Originally Posted by electronics_kumar
    moreover .why it should be RMS ....why should not as +340V,-340V while referring
    because, simply said, this value (rms) is sort of a mean value which is engaged in, especially, power calculations, etc.

    e.g. for resistive loads power can be simply calculated multiplying current and voltage rms values: P = Vrms * Irms, whatever waveform it represents!
    (or P = Vrms*Vrms/Rload, or P = Irms*Irms*Rload, likewise with dc values)

    Referring to the peak value (only for sine waveforms!!!) power would be calculated:
    P = Vpeak * Ipeak / 2 (or P = Vrms*Vrms/(2*Rload), or P = Irms*Irms*Rload/2)

    It allows to compare or evaluate "power contents" of different waveforms in a way, while its peak values don't give any information as to this point.

    Best Regards
    Eric



  7. #7
    Advanced Member level 2
    Points: 7,347, Level: 20
    the_risk_master's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    UE+MIT, Philippines, (14°N , 120°E )
    Posts
    662
    Helped
    81 / 81
    Points
    7,347
    Level
    20

    rms 220v

    Try to grab a Digital Multimeter (select it as to measure AC voltage with range of at least higher on what you are expected to measure) Now read the Meter, it should read 220V (note all meter device should read RMS values)



  8. #8
    Member level 3
    Points: 3,616, Level: 14

    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    67
    Helped
    20 / 20
    Points
    3,616
    Level
    14

    220 vrms

    Quote Originally Posted by the_risk_master
    Try to grab a Digital Multimeter (select it as to measure AC voltage with range of at least higher on what you are expected to measure) Now read the Meter, it should read 220V (note all meter device should read RMS values)
    To tell the truth the above is not always true. Multimeters usually display rms value but this fact does not mean they really measure it. If they do, you can see the notice "True RMS" somewhere on the device and such a device is also appropriately more expensive (it requires a built-in rms converter). Other devices usually measure peak or mean value of a rectified waveform and take advantage of the fact that the relations between peak/mean and rms (root mean square) values for a known waveform, in this case sine wave, are constants so that they can recalculate it and display. This fact implies that such a device displays the more inaccurate value (sometimes really nonsens) the more the measured waveform "differs" from sine wave.
    For instance waveforms in circuits with a phase controlled SCR (thyristor or triac) give quite big errors measured with non-true rms devices.

    Just for interest, the mentioned values are defined as follows:
    For periodic waveforms v(t):

    mean value =


    rms value = ,

    where T is the time period.

    Sine wave:
    If v(t) = M×sin(ωt),
    where M ... peak value of the sine wave,
    ω = =&nbsp ... circular frequency, we obtain:

    mean value = 0

    if fully rectified, then

    mean value = = 0.637M ... relation between mean (fully rectified) and peak value

    rms value = = 0.707M ... relation between rms and peak value

    rms/mean (fully rect.) = = 0.707/0.637 = 1.11 ... relation between rms and mean value of fully rectified sine wave

    Best Regards
    Eric
    Last edited by BlackMamba; 27th August 2010 at 12:58.



    •   Alt16th December 2005, 19:44

      advertising

        
       

  9. #9
    Full Member level 3
    Points: 3,254, Level: 13
    xjackal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    150
    Helped
    18 / 18
    Points
    3,254
    Level
    13

    sin rms peak

    Root Mean Square



    •   Alt19th December 2005, 03:51

      advertising

        
       

  10. #10
    Member level 1
    Points: 1,484, Level: 8

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    39
    Helped
    3 / 3
    Points
    1,484
    Level
    8

    220 v peak to peak

    Quote Originally Posted by ysenthilece
    sorry for this silly question .but i can't find the answer anywhere..
    this value is its rms it means root mean square so we calculate power from this values of voltage and current directly



  11. #11
    Newbie level 1
    Points: 1,045, Level: 7

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1
    Helped
    0 / 0
    Points
    1,045
    Level
    7

    relation between rms and peak value

    220 is rms.peak voltage is 1.4*220=308v



  12. #12
    Newbie level 3
    Points: 1,085, Level: 7

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    4
    Helped
    0 / 0
    Points
    1,085
    Level
    7

    rms voltage 220v

    it is a RMS voltage



  13. #13
    Junior Member level 3
    Points: 1,152, Level: 7

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    30
    Helped
    0 / 0
    Points
    1,152
    Level
    7

    i rms i peak

    it is exaclty rms (root mean square) and it peak voltage is √2×220 (v).



  14. #14
    Full Member level 4
    Points: 2,347, Level: 11

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    India
    Posts
    195
    Helped
    9 / 9
    Points
    2,347
    Level
    11

    rms and peak to peak

    RMS VALUE



  15. #15
    Member level 3
    Points: 3,616, Level: 14

    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    67
    Helped
    20 / 20
    Points
    3,616
    Level
    14

    it(rms) scr calculation

    Are you collecting points or what?

    STOP these stupid messages, everybody already KNOWS it is rms!!!



  16. #16
    Full Member level 5
    Points: 1,993, Level: 10

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    241
    Helped
    11 / 11
    Points
    1,993
    Level
    10

    calculate 220 rms peak value

    if its a sine wave its rms value..
    if its a nonsinusoidal wave it wont be RMS...any way becoz every wave can be converted as composition of sine wave there is a true rms meter which gives rms for any wave..gen all ac and dc volts xpressed in rms ..



  17. #17
    Newbie level 6
    Points: 1,168, Level: 7

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    11
    Helped
    0 / 0
    Points
    1,168
    Level
    7

    310v sine rms

    It should be rms.



  18. #18
    Full Member level 1
    Points: 2,033, Level: 10

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    India
    Posts
    114
    Helped
    9 / 9
    Points
    2,033
    Level
    10

    26 vrms vs peak

    Its RMS .Please check BL thereja u can get all the details.



  19. #19
    Full Member level 6
    Points: 5,417, Level: 17

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Italy
    Posts
    384
    Helped
    39 / 39
    Points
    5,417
    Level
    17

    220v rms peak

    It is RMS, the peak voltage is RMS * sqare root o f2, say about 310 V.
    The multimeters ( low price ) usually rectify the voltage ( taking the peak voltage ) and then they divide it by SQRT of 2.

    Mandi



  20. #20
    Newbie level 4
    Points: 1,410, Level: 8
    asas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    7
    Helped
    0 / 0
    Points
    1,410
    Level
    8

    p=vrms*irms

    It's RMS!
    Low price multimeters aren't True RMS, but if the signal you are messuring it's a Sine Wave there's no problem!! If not, the values shown would not be correct.........




+ Post New Thread
Please login
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast