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    vrms formula

    can someone give me a link on where i can get the relationship between VRMS and VDC( given rectified signal below) or are the the same ?

    hxxp://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/images/dcvary.gif

    thank you

    •   Alt25th February 2008, 14:27

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    vrms to vdc

    I'm not sure if this is what you are looking for, but, Vrms of a signal is the equivalent DC voltage that would dissipate the same energy. For example if the Vrms of a signal is 10 V, and it is connected to a resistor R, that resistor would dissipate the same energy as if we had a 10 V DC source connected to the R load, in stead of the AC source mentioned...

    i'm not really sure if i am making myself clear...


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    vrms vdc

    just multiply your AC voltage to square root of 2 ~ 1.4, it will give you the DC voltage after bridge rectifier.


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    vrms vs vdc

    If what you wanted is how to get the vrms value of that signal, si quite easy. What fala said is just an approximation.

    Vrms stands for "root mean square" voltage, this is, what you have to do is calculate the root of the mean value of the square of your signal. In other words, if you have a signal specified by then:

    1) Calculate the square power of the signal. We do this in order to avoid negative numbers:


    2) Calculate the mean value of this signal. For this, you have to take on account what the mean value is: It's the sum of all the values, divided by the number of values calculated. As the signal is a periodic one, the mean value for one period will be the same as for all the periods, so we just calculate one period for simplicity. Then:


    3) And finally we calculate the square root of the above to "normalize" the signal (remember we first squared the signal). So finally the Vrms remains:



    Now let's calculate Vrms for the specific case of your signal. As you can see, that rectified signal is like a sine wave squared and rooted (all the negative values made positive), so calculating the Vrms for a sine wave is the same as for your signal. Then let's imagine our wave is , where is the peak value of our signal.

    If you look close, once squared the signal, its period is , assuming T was the period for the sine wave. For ease of calculation, instead of integrating in it's better if we integrate in , for simplifying calcula. So the period will be going from 0 to (in stead of ). Then:



    Resolving:











    Finally:



    So, returning back to the explanation, if you have an AC source with a peak voltage connected to a resistor R, the Vrms value would represent the energy that would be dissipated by the resistor would be the same as if you changed the AC source for a DC one of value

    What fala says, is not actually the DC component but the peak value of your rectified (not yet filtered) signal.

    I hope this clears it a little bit more.


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    vdc formula

    ...and the above is only valid for sinusoidal signals.

    If you for instance have a square wave signal, Vrms equals Vpeak.


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    •   Alt25th February 2008, 22:45

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    vrms to vac

    Well, in bridge rectifiers, you usually use a capacitor that charges to the peak value,so...?



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    vdc and vrms

    Quote Originally Posted by halls
    I'm not sure if this is what you are looking for, but, Vrms of a signal is the equivalent DC voltage that would dissipate the same energy. For example if the Vrms of a signal is 10 V, and it is connected to a resistor R, that resistor would dissipate the same energy as if we had a 10 V DC source connected to the R load, in stead of the AC source mentioned...

    i'm not really sure if i am making myself clear...


    Given the rectified signal below, Vrms= 0.707 (Vm/sqrt2)and Vdc= .636Vm (2Vm/pi)



    As you've said "Vrms of a signal is the equivalent DC voltage that would dissipate the same energy"

    So what does VDC represent? i don't understand....



    •   Alt26th February 2008, 01:50

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    vdc to vrms

    Quote Originally Posted by XNOX_Rambo
    ...and the above is only valid for sinusoidal signals.

    If you for instance have a square wave signal, Vrms equals Vpeak.
    Fine... and? What newgirl was asking was a sinusoidal rectified signal. Actually, this equation is valid for ANY periodic signal:



    If you apply this equation to the square signal you mentioned, you get that Vrms = Vpeak. But our case of study was the specific case of a sinusoidal, which is the reason i did all that stuff, and why the solution is


    Quote Originally Posted by fala
    Well, in bridge rectifiers, you usually use a capacitor that charges to the peak value,so...?
    That's true, but the fact that they get charged to the maximum peak value doesn't mean the rectified DC signal's value is that maximum value. Actually it isn't, i'll explain.

    If you charge a capacitor with a constant value, it will start charging until it gets the maximum value, which is that constant voltage. But if what you charge with is an alternating value (like the rectified sinusoidal) you will have a variable charge. If you look close to what happens in the capacitor you will see that in the raising half period of the signal, until it gets to the peak, the capacitor will start charging, getting to its maximum value. But when the signal starts to decrease, voltage in capacitor will also decrease, slower than the signal of course, but decreasing as well.

    There's some point where the signal starts increasing again, and encounters a discharging capacitor, which will start charging again. So what in the end you will have is an alternating signal which will be variating from peak value to another value which will be the maximum discharge value allowed by the variable input signal. It's something similar to this (it's not exactly the same case): http://content.answers.com/main/cont.../Reservoir.gif

    To this you have to add that there are also ohmic losses and so, signal will be lost too. So, summarizing, that final rectified DC signal won't be the peak value in any case.


    Quote Originally Posted by newgirl
    As you've said "Vrms of a signal is the equivalent DC voltage that would dissipate the same energy"

    So what does VDC represent? i don't understand....
    I'm not sure what VDC you are talking about... You might be talking about the filtered DC voltage you get in the output, which of course is not the same as the Vrms, for the reasons explained above. Anyways i'll have to check out when i get home, because this gets a little far from when i studied it so i might be forgetting something.

    Trying to not confuse you, the DC voltage i was talking about was just that from the definition of Vrms, and may be not the same as the one you are talking about, so take it on account, that i just might have not understood right the VDC you asked for...

    Added after 32 minutes:

    Last minute discovery!

    Quote Originally Posted by newgirl
    Given the rectified signal below, Vrms= 0.707 (Vm/sqrt2)and Vdc= .636Vm (2Vm/pi)
    So what does VDC represent? i don't understand....
    As seen in the picture below, the VDC you refer to is the voltage after capacitor filtering. This is, if after the full wave rectifier, whose output is the image you displayed, you put a capacitor, the DC voltage achieved could be approximated to the value you mention.



    This is my best guess by the moment :D


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    different vdc vrms

    Quote Originally Posted by halls
    Quote Originally Posted by fala
    Well, in bridge rectifiers, you usually use a capacitor that charges to the peak value,so...?
    That's true, but the fact that they get charged to the maximum peak value doesn't mean the rectified DC signal's value is that maximum value. Actually it isn't, i'll explain.

    If you charge a capacitor with a constant value, it will start charging until it gets the maximum value, which is that constant voltage. But if what you charge with is an alternating value (like the rectified sinusoidal) you will have a variable charge. If you look close to what happens in the capacitor you will see that in the raising half period of the signal, until it gets to the peak, the capacitor will start charging, getting to its maximum value. But when the signal starts to decrease, voltage in capacitor will also decrease, slower than the signal of course, but decreasing as well.

    There's some point where the signal starts increasing again, and encounters a discharging capacitor, which will start charging again. So what in the end you will have is an alternating signal which will be variating from peak value to another value which will be the maximum discharge value allowed by the variable input signal. It's something similar to this (it's not exactly the same case): http://content.answers.com/main/cont.../Reservoir.gif

    To this you have to add that there are also ohmic losses and so, signal will be lost too. So, summarizing, that final rectified DC signal won't be the peak value in any case.
    Wrong! the job of diodes in bridge rectifier is to make sure that only charging of capacitor happens not discharging, so even when output of bridge rectifier would have been lower than capacitor voltage if capacitor wasn't present at all, diodes do not let any discharge of capacitor happens! unless those diodes leak hell of current or in other words unless those diodes are faulty!
    The only scenario that may leads to drop of voltage in rectifier capacitor is when load demand is higher than the capacity of capacitor to maintain constant voltage. In this case simply with increasing rectifier capacitor value problem can be solved.

    @Newgirl,
    if you want to rectify a low voltage signal and you are concerned about diode drop you have to build an ideal bridge circuit using OpAmp, search google for ideal diode and ideal bridge + opamp you will find plenty of information.



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    vdc vrms

    Quote Originally Posted by halls
    Fine... and? What newgirl was asking was a sinusoidal rectified signal. Actually, this equation is valid for ANY periodic signal:

    Good, "ANY" was the word missing from your explanation.

    The special cases - and thus the notion of "crest factor" - is also something that junior engineers should know
    so that they don't take incorrect readings on non-sinusoidal signals using non-TrueRMS multimeters:

    Crest factor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



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    vrms vdc

    Quote Originally Posted by fala
    Wrong! the job of diodes in bridge rectifier is to make sure that only charging of capacitor happens not discharging, so even when output of bridge rectifier would have been lower than capacitor voltage if capacitor wasn't present at all, diodes do not let any discharge of capacitor happens! unless those diodes leak hell of current or in other words unless those diodes are faulty!
    The only scenario that may leads to drop of voltage in rectifier capacitor is when load demand is higher than the capacity of capacitor to maintain constant voltage. In this case simply with increasing rectifier capacitor value problem can be solved.
    Ehrm... i believe you are mistaken. Discharging doesn't mean the capacitor voltage between terminals reaches null. When a capacitor is charging, the voltage in its terminals getting higher. In the moment the applied voltage is lower than that in the terminals, its behavior changes to a discharging behavior, which means it offers voltage in stead of taking.

    If you see a graph of the voltage output after a capacitor in the output stage of a rectifier (alas, the picture i posted above), you will see how a little "negative ramp" appears from max voltage. This happens exactly when the input signal (the one strictly coming out from the rectifier) starts decreasing. As the capacitor was charged at the maximum voltage, when the signal is lower, the capacitor has more voltage than the one it is being applied, thus, it starts discharging.

    While the capacitor is discharging, the rectified input (that coming from the output of the bridge rectifier) is decreasing. But then reaches a point where it starts increasing again (look at first picture of the thread). There is a point when the increasing signal reaches the voltage of the capacitor and keeps raising, thus charging again the capacitor, and the procedure repeats again. This is why the capacitor never gets absolutely discharged.

    What you are saying about the diode rectifier doesn't have to do directly with the capacitor. You can have a bridge rectifier with no capacitor, and their job will be the same one: change negative cycles of the signal to positive ones, so there are not any negative cycles in the signal (that is what is called rectifying).


    Take a look at this page i found: http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_6/chpt_5/6.html



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    vm=vrms

    Quote Originally Posted by halls
    Quote Originally Posted by fala
    Wrong! the job of diodes in bridge rectifier is to make sure that only charging of capacitor happens not discharging, so even when output of bridge rectifier would have been lower than capacitor voltage if capacitor wasn't present at all, diodes do not let any discharge of capacitor happens! unless those diodes leak hell of current or in other words unless those diodes are faulty!
    The only scenario that may leads to drop of voltage in rectifier capacitor is when load demand is higher than the capacity of capacitor to maintain constant voltage. In this case simply with increasing rectifier capacitor value problem can be solved.
    Ehrm... i believe you are mistaken. Discharging doesn't mean the capacitor voltage between terminals reaches null. When a capacitor is charging, the voltage in its terminals getting higher. In the moment the applied voltage is lower than that in the terminals, its behavior changes to a discharging behavior, which means it offers voltage in stead of taking.

    If you see a graph of the voltage output after a capacitor in the output stage of a rectifier (alas, the picture i posted above), you will see how a little "negative ramp" appears from max voltage. This happens exactly when the input signal (the one strictly coming out from the rectifier) starts decreasing. As the capacitor was charged at the maximum voltage, when the signal is lower, the capacitor has more voltage than the one it is being applied, thus, it starts discharging.

    While the capacitor is discharging, the rectified input (that coming from the output of the bridge rectifier) is decreasing. But then reaches a point where it starts increasing again (look at first picture of the thread). There is a point when the increasing signal reaches the voltage of the capacitor and keeps raising, thus charging again the capacitor, and the procedure repeats again. This is why the capacitor never gets absolutely discharged.

    What you are saying about the diode rectifier doesn't have to do directly with the capacitor. You can have a bridge rectifier with no capacitor, and their job will be the same one: change negative cycles of the signal to positive ones, so there are not any negative cycles in the signal (that is what is called rectifying).


    Take a look at this page i found: http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_6/chpt_5/6.html
    halls as I said you are wrong. I saw the picture you posted(actually I saw it many years ago). If you see voltage of capacitor drops, it is not because it is discharging by bridge rectifier. As I said diodes will never allow discharging current. The reason for the drop you see is, after the peak diodes turn off and load only is supplied by cap if load demand is high enough it will cause a discharge in capacitor and a drop of voltage but if you place a big enough cap that dose not happen. those pictures are for educational purposes the amount of drop is only determined by capacitor capacity and load current. I said what it and I don't see any need to repeat many times unless you bring some evidence to prove there is a hole in my knowledge. do not post a link to whole lengthy page because I do not have time to re read what I already know. If you are sure I'm wrong just post very explicit short quotes that proves I'm wrong from a page then post the link of that page so I make sure the page worth reading.
    I also invite other electronic men to judge our posts


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    vrms = 0.707 vm

    Now i think we both are saying the same thing but from different points of view...

    Quote Originally Posted by fala
    If you see voltage of capacitor drops, it is not because it is discharging by bridge rectifier.
    i think i never said it was discharging by the rectifier, i might not have made myself clear in this, sorry. What i meant to say was that when the voltage supplied to the cap is lower than that already charged in the cap, the cap tends to discharge. Of course that discharging will be across the load, because the load gets more volts from the cap than from the rectifier...

    Quote Originally Posted by fala
    As I said diodes will never allow discharging current.
    When you talk about discharging current i believe you talk about current towards the left side of the cap, this is, the rectifier. Then we agree (actually is what i was saying in posts above). But there is a discharging current, towards the load, so the cap DOES discharge.

    Quote Originally Posted by fala
    The reason for the drop you see is, after the peak diodes turn off and load only is supplied by cap if load demand is high enough it will cause a discharge in capacitor and a drop of voltage but if you place a big enough cap that dose not happen.
    Now i don't agree with this one, sorry. I agree that the bigger the cap, the slower the discharging rate, which means that the voltage will remain closer to the peak value for longer, but there will always be a discharging rate, even if this is very small.

    Quote Originally Posted by fala
    those pictures are for educational purposes the amount of drop is only determined by capacitor capacity and load current. I said what it and I don't see any need to repeat many times unless you bring some evidence to prove there is a hole in my knowledge. do not post a link to whole lengthy page because I do not have time to re read what I already know.
    I don't think the matter is who knows best... is just someone was misunderstanding the other's explanation, and finally seemed to be both of us. But sometimes it is worth to take the little time to try to understand what the other one is trying to say.

    Quote Originally Posted by fala
    I also invite other electronic men to judge our posts
    You said it :)



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    difference between vrms and vdc

    Hi newgirl,

    Your question did not specify if you have or do not have rezervoir capacitor attached.

    With no load attached and rezervoir capacitor attached to full or half wave rectifier, output will equal |Vin|*√2 which is absolute peak value of Vac input.
    If load is attached voltage will vary between pak value and value determined by capacitor size and load current. litle more can be seen here:
    http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/~www_pa/...rt5/page1.html

    If you under Vdc think of average voltage and just want to know difference between RMS and average values of full rectified sinewave voltage then look here:
    http://www.opamp-electronics.com/tut...de_2_01_03.htm

    Full rectified pure sinewave values of Vavg and Vrms would be:
    Vpk = √2 *Vrms
    Vpk = Vavg*Π/2
    so, Vavg=2*√2*Vrms/Π

    Rms capable meter will show RMS value always, while average measuring meter will show RMS value only when dealing with pure sinewave or it's rectified version. Average meter is calibrated to show RMS value and because relationship between Vavg and Vrms for sinewave is linear, reading will remain accurate. If waveform is something different than pure sinewave, reading between two meters will shift appart.
    This is actually used when measuring ammount of harmonics in electrical power systems. Difference between RMS and average responding ammeters reveals ammount of harmonics present because of non-linear loads (power supplies that we just talked about for example )


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    vrms vdc square wave

    @halls and falla

    Thanks! I think i was analyzing it too mathematically. I agree that both of you may saying the same thing from diff points of view... but i understand it now thanks

    @Sinisa

    Yes i will attach a capacitor and load later on on the circuit... i just want to familiarize myself step by step...

    Thanks again everyone!

    Added after 6 minutes:

    Quote Originally Posted by halls

    Last minute discovery!

    Quote Originally Posted by newgirl
    Given the rectified signal below, Vrms= 0.707 (Vm/sqrt2)and Vdc= .636Vm (2Vm/pi)
    So what does VDC represent? i don't understand....
    As seen in the picture below, the VDC you refer to is the voltage after capacitor filtering. This is, if after the full wave rectifier, whose output is the image you displayed, you put a capacitor, the DC voltage achieved could be approximated to the value you mention.



    This is my best guess by the moment :D
    Vdc formula can also be used before adding capacitor , rectifier output( I got that equation from boylestad book -- diode as rectifier )

    thanks again halls.. really appreciate it



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    Re: vrms formula

    Quote Originally Posted by newgirl
    can someone give me a link on where i can get the relationship between VRMS and VDC( given rectified signal below) or are the the same ?

    hxxp://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/images/dcvary.gif

    thank you
    I had the same question. Why do we seem to have two average values for DC voltages for the same original AC signal (before rectification). Indeed we have Vdc and Vrms ... and they are components of the same signal.

    V rms is the effective value of the ac signal. V rms works out to (via the sqr root of the mean of the square of the signal function) = V max (or peak) divided by √2. This is for the whole AC signal. A DC voltage of the same value would dissipate as much power on the load (assume: resistor). I.e. 120Vrms = 120Vdc.

    However, if we rectify the sinusoid signal we end up with a DC pulse signal (it's no longer an ac signal, but a DC signal with pulse characteristics) that can be interpreted by Fourier Series as having a DC component and several harmonics. We can separate the two. On one hand we have just a DC value and on the other hand we have a ripple. That ripple when looked at by it self is just another sinusoid... and as we know a sinusoid will have an rms value.

    The ripple factor RF = Vripple rms / Vdc, where Vripple rms is the equivalent DC component of the ripple voltage, that we must add to the offset DC amount if we're to have an exact DC quantity and the right amount of power transfered.
    P = VI where V = Vdc offset + Vrms (of the Vripple that sits on top of the DC offset).

    So we have a big DC signal (Vdc) plus a little more DC from the ripple (V rip rms) and when added together will give you the actual Vrms of the original signal.

    So V dc (V average) is about 63.6% or (2/pi) of V peak or V max and,
    V rms is about 70.7% or (1/√2) of V peak or V max.

    Although we're talking no filters here. These percentage values will change slightly depending on what you connect as a filter.

    Cheers



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